Autism/Asperger’s Basics

10 07 2009

Recently, a friend at work asked if I would help her on a potential paper for a class she was taking. She asked me to give her a brief explanation or definition of Autism/Asperger’s Disorder. I am reposting my response here (mostly a summarization from the included links) because I think it works as a basic explanation for those who don’t know:

What is autism?

Autism is a developmental disability. The initial symptoms usually develop during the preschool years. The symptoms vary depending on the individual, but all forms of autism make social interaction and communication a challenge.

Healthcare providers classify autism as a “spectrum” disorder – “a group of disorders with similar features” — because of the marked differences in the way autism presents itself in different individuals. The symptoms of the disorders in the autistic spectrum vary in severity, but they all have common features, notably a difficulty with communication and learning social skills. The disorders included in the autism spectrum include:

·Autistic Disorder (“classic autism”)

·Asperger’s Disorder

·Pervasive Development Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (often called PDD or PDD-NOS).

My son has been diagnosed as having Asperger’s Disorder. Asperger’s is a high-functioning form of autism. Children (and adults) with this condition seem like everyone else. Just by looking at them you would not know that they have any sort of disorder.

People with Asperger’s tend to have average to above average intelligence. Their symptoms tend to present themselves in the form of a marked difficulty in social situations. They do not pick up social cues naturally. They often show symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder, and have difficulty with variations from their routines. They sometimes avoid eye contact. They sometimes have long-winded, one-sided conversations. They often have trouble making and keeping friends. Noises, lights, and other external stimuli may bother them or distract them. Sometimes, kids with Asperger’s Disorder are called “Little Professors” because of the way they talk, study, and act. They often have a large vocabulary and use words and phrases that are above their grade level. They become focused on particular subjects and study them compulsively and obsessively. They sometimes have delayed motor development, having a hard time buttoning pants, tying shoes, and are often uncoordinated at sports.

Here’s a blog post I wrote a while back where I went over all the different tests used to diagnose Asperger’s in my son: http://southernweirdo.livejournal.com/63249.html. Here’s another link I think you might find interesting for a potential paper — http://www.theautismnews.com/2009/06/28/rise-in-autistic-adults-worries-caregivers/. It concerns what happens to people with “classic autism” once they become adults. There is a little bit about Asperger’s mentioned in the article as well. Everyone feels sorry for kids with autism, because kids are cute, but what happens when they grow up? I think this topic deserves more attention.

Sources:

http://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/asd.cfm

http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/tc/aspergers-syndrome-symptoms  

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160 responses

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

I totally agree with you. The whole attitude sometimes seems to be to pretend these things simply don’t exist, and that doesn’t seem right to me. Thanks for informing us!

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

That’s the truth. There are people within my own family that I know are of the opinion that I simply don’t “discipline” my kid enough. People said the same thing to my mom when I was a little boy.

They have no idea. And honestly, until this last year, I thought I knew but I’m only just now really beginning to understand.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

Stay strong!

I can only imagine how hard it can be, but from reading your entries, I also get the sense that it has its rewards as well. And you seem to have come through really well, so there’s lots and lots of upside.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

Stay strong!

I can only imagine how hard it can be, but from reading your entries, I also get the sense that it has its rewards as well. And you seem to have come through really well, so there’s lots and lots of upside.

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

That’s the truth. There are people within my own family that I know are of the opinion that I simply don’t “discipline” my kid enough. People said the same thing to my mom when I was a little boy.

They have no idea. And honestly, until this last year, I thought I knew but I’m only just now really beginning to understand.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

I totally agree with you. The whole attitude sometimes seems to be to pretend these things simply don’t exist, and that doesn’t seem right to me. Thanks for informing us!

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

I totally agree with you. The whole attitude sometimes seems to be to pretend these things simply don’t exist, and that doesn’t seem right to me. Thanks for informing us!

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

I totally agree with you. The whole attitude sometimes seems to be to pretend these things simply don’t exist, and that doesn’t seem right to me. Thanks for informing us!

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

I totally agree with you. The whole attitude sometimes seems to be to pretend these things simply don’t exist, and that doesn’t seem right to me. Thanks for informing us!

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

That’s the truth. There are people within my own family that I know are of the opinion that I simply don’t “discipline” my kid enough. People said the same thing to my mom when I was a little boy.

They have no idea. And honestly, until this last year, I thought I knew but I’m only just now really beginning to understand.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

Stay strong!

I can only imagine how hard it can be, but from reading your entries, I also get the sense that it has its rewards as well. And you seem to have come through really well, so there’s lots and lots of upside.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

I totally agree with you. The whole attitude sometimes seems to be to pretend these things simply don’t exist, and that doesn’t seem right to me. Thanks for informing us!

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

That’s the truth. There are people within my own family that I know are of the opinion that I simply don’t “discipline” my kid enough. People said the same thing to my mom when I was a little boy.

They have no idea. And honestly, until this last year, I thought I knew but I’m only just now really beginning to understand.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

Stay strong!

I can only imagine how hard it can be, but from reading your entries, I also get the sense that it has its rewards as well. And you seem to have come through really well, so there’s lots and lots of upside.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

I totally agree with you. The whole attitude sometimes seems to be to pretend these things simply don’t exist, and that doesn’t seem right to me. Thanks for informing us!

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

That’s the truth. There are people within my own family that I know are of the opinion that I simply don’t “discipline” my kid enough. People said the same thing to my mom when I was a little boy.
They have no idea. And honestly, until this last year, I thought I knew but I’m only just now really beginning to understand.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

Stay strong!
I can only imagine how hard it can be, but from reading your entries, I also get the sense that it has its rewards as well. And you seem to have come through really well, so there’s lots and lots of upside.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

Stay strong!
I can only imagine how hard it can be, but from reading your entries, I also get the sense that it has its rewards as well. And you seem to have come through really well, so there’s lots and lots of upside.

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

That’s the truth. There are people within my own family that I know are of the opinion that I simply don’t “discipline” my kid enough. People said the same thing to my mom when I was a little boy.
They have no idea. And honestly, until this last year, I thought I knew but I’m only just now really beginning to understand.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

I totally agree with you. The whole attitude sometimes seems to be to pretend these things simply don’t exist, and that doesn’t seem right to me. Thanks for informing us!

10 07 2009
jongibbs

What is autism? That’s a real, how long is a piece of string question.

For example, in my daughters’ case, autism is being eight years old before they could point to me when someone asked who Daddy is (and being twelve before they could say that Daddy’s name is ‘Jon’)

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

Exactly!

I get the question all the time these days it seems, and it’s hard to give a solid answer. That’s why I’m writing out this answer, so I can better answer it in the future when asked.

I can tell people specifically what it means in my son’s case, for the most part, but the symptoms may present themselves in a completely different way for someone else with the same disorder.

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

Exactly!

I get the question all the time these days it seems, and it’s hard to give a solid answer. That’s why I’m writing out this answer, so I can better answer it in the future when asked.

I can tell people specifically what it means in my son’s case, for the most part, but the symptoms may present themselves in a completely different way for someone else with the same disorder.

10 07 2009
jongibbs

What is autism? That’s a real, how long is a piece of string question.

For example, in my daughters’ case, autism is being eight years old before they could point to me when someone asked who Daddy is (and being twelve before they could say that Daddy’s name is ‘Jon’)

10 07 2009
jongibbs

What is autism? That’s a real, how long is a piece of string question.

For example, in my daughters’ case, autism is being eight years old before they could point to me when someone asked who Daddy is (and being twelve before they could say that Daddy’s name is ‘Jon’)

10 07 2009
jongibbs

What is autism? That’s a real, how long is a piece of string question.

For example, in my daughters’ case, autism is being eight years old before they could point to me when someone asked who Daddy is (and being twelve before they could say that Daddy’s name is ‘Jon’)

10 07 2009
jongibbs

What is autism? That’s a real, how long is a piece of string question.

For example, in my daughters’ case, autism is being eight years old before they could point to me when someone asked who Daddy is (and being twelve before they could say that Daddy’s name is ‘Jon’)

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

Exactly!

I get the question all the time these days it seems, and it’s hard to give a solid answer. That’s why I’m writing out this answer, so I can better answer it in the future when asked.

I can tell people specifically what it means in my son’s case, for the most part, but the symptoms may present themselves in a completely different way for someone else with the same disorder.

10 07 2009
jongibbs

What is autism? That’s a real, how long is a piece of string question.

For example, in my daughters’ case, autism is being eight years old before they could point to me when someone asked who Daddy is (and being twelve before they could say that Daddy’s name is ‘Jon’)

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

Exactly!

I get the question all the time these days it seems, and it’s hard to give a solid answer. That’s why I’m writing out this answer, so I can better answer it in the future when asked.

I can tell people specifically what it means in my son’s case, for the most part, but the symptoms may present themselves in a completely different way for someone else with the same disorder.

10 07 2009
jongibbs

What is autism? That’s a real, how long is a piece of string question.
For example, in my daughters’ case, autism is being eight years old before they could point to me when someone asked who Daddy is (and being twelve before they could say that Daddy’s name is ‘Jon’)

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

Exactly!
I get the question all the time these days it seems, and it’s hard to give a solid answer. That’s why I’m writing out this answer, so I can better answer it in the future when asked.
I can tell people specifically what it means in my son’s case, for the most part, but the symptoms may present themselves in a completely different way for someone else with the same disorder.

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

Exactly!
I get the question all the time these days it seems, and it’s hard to give a solid answer. That’s why I’m writing out this answer, so I can better answer it in the future when asked.
I can tell people specifically what it means in my son’s case, for the most part, but the symptoms may present themselves in a completely different way for someone else with the same disorder.

10 07 2009
jongibbs

What is autism? That’s a real, how long is a piece of string question.
For example, in my daughters’ case, autism is being eight years old before they could point to me when someone asked who Daddy is (and being twelve before they could say that Daddy’s name is ‘Jon’)

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

Exactly!

I get the question all the time these days it seems, and it’s hard to give a solid answer. That’s why I’m writing out this answer, so I can better answer it in the future when asked.

I can tell people specifically what it means in my son’s case, for the most part, but the symptoms may present themselves in a completely different way for someone else with the same disorder.

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

Exactly!

I get the question all the time these days it seems, and it’s hard to give a solid answer. That’s why I’m writing out this answer, so I can better answer it in the future when asked.

I can tell people specifically what it means in my son’s case, for the most part, but the symptoms may present themselves in a completely different way for someone else with the same disorder.

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

That’s the truth. There are people within my own family that I know are of the opinion that I simply don’t “discipline” my kid enough. People said the same thing to my mom when I was a little boy.

They have no idea. And honestly, until this last year, I thought I knew but I’m only just now really beginning to understand.

10 07 2009
southernweirdo

That’s the truth. There are people within my own family that I know are of the opinion that I simply don’t “discipline” my kid enough. People said the same thing to my mom when I was a little boy.

They have no idea. And honestly, until this last year, I thought I knew but I’m only just now really beginning to understand.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

Stay strong!

I can only imagine how hard it can be, but from reading your entries, I also get the sense that it has its rewards as well. And you seem to have come through really well, so there’s lots and lots of upside.

10 07 2009
bondo_ba

Stay strong!

I can only imagine how hard it can be, but from reading your entries, I also get the sense that it has its rewards as well. And you seem to have come through really well, so there’s lots and lots of upside.

10 07 2009
xjenavivex

Man your short description of Aspergers sounds just like me. Really.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Same here. I wonder if we can’t all find ourselves in the spectrum, everyone needing some degree of help to understand others and make ourselves understood, to get along, to cope with change, etc.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Same here. I wonder if we can’t all find ourselves in the spectrum, everyone needing some degree of help to understand others and make ourselves understood, to get along, to cope with change, etc.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I believe it. I think there are lots of Aspies out there who are undiagnosed (myself included).

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I believe it. I think there are lots of Aspies out there who are undiagnosed (myself included).

10 07 2009
xjenavivex

Man your short description of Aspergers sounds just like me. Really.

10 07 2009
xjenavivex

Man your short description of Aspergers sounds just like me. Really.

10 07 2009
xjenavivex

Man your short description of Aspergers sounds just like me. Really.

10 07 2009
xjenavivex

Man your short description of Aspergers sounds just like me. Really.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Same here. I wonder if we can’t all find ourselves in the spectrum, everyone needing some degree of help to understand others and make ourselves understood, to get along, to cope with change, etc.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I believe it. I think there are lots of Aspies out there who are undiagnosed (myself included).

10 07 2009
xjenavivex

Man your short description of Aspergers sounds just like me. Really.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Same here. I wonder if we can’t all find ourselves in the spectrum, everyone needing some degree of help to understand others and make ourselves understood, to get along, to cope with change, etc.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I believe it. I think there are lots of Aspies out there who are undiagnosed (myself included).

10 07 2009
xjenavivex

Man your short description of Aspergers sounds just like me. Really.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Same here. I wonder if we can’t all find ourselves in the spectrum, everyone needing some degree of help to understand others and make ourselves understood, to get along, to cope with change, etc.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Same here. I wonder if we can’t all find ourselves in the spectrum, everyone needing some degree of help to understand others and make ourselves understood, to get along, to cope with change, etc.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I believe it. I think there are lots of Aspies out there who are undiagnosed (myself included).

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I believe it. I think there are lots of Aspies out there who are undiagnosed (myself included).

10 07 2009
xjenavivex

Man your short description of Aspergers sounds just like me. Really.

11 07 2009
grayrose76

This is a good entry! I am going to chime in with description of PDD-NOS, since that’s what my son is.

I think PDD-NOS covers the widest part of the spectrum and the kids in this range have a variety of outcomes. At almost 3yo, my son has recently started developing some language, but still mostly uses individual words, though he did master a sentence lately (“I want x”). He knows who daddy is, but does not understand questions and will not respond to questions when asked. I am not sure he knows who mama is, though he does say it occasionally. Like most children with PDD-NOS, he has almost no pretend play. He does sometimes pretend to eat or drink, but does not play imaginatively with his toys.

Children with PDD-NOS usually do develop some functional language (if they don’t, they are later reclassified as having classical autism), though level of functionality varies widely. Not all PDD-NOS children can be mainstreamed in school. Some PDD-NOS children do eventually go to college; I know one young man who is doing quite well.

You will usually able to recognize a PDD-NOS child in a public place because a PDD-NOS child will often tantrum in public, and exhibit stereotypical behaviors such as hand-flapping, rocking, spinning around, headbanging, etc. A PDD-NOS child will usually have poor eye contact, will not initiate any contact with strangers, and will usually ignore them.

In terms of physical development, most PDD-NOS children are developmentally delayed in that area as well. They will probably have trouble riding bicycles, participating in sports that require extensive goal planning, etc.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for the information. I read a little about PDD-NOS when we started the diagnostic process for my son.

Good luck to you and your boy. He’s got parents who care and who are willing to educate themselves. That’s a huge factor in his favor for future success right there.

Stay strong.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for the information. I read a little about PDD-NOS when we started the diagnostic process for my son.

Good luck to you and your boy. He’s got parents who care and who are willing to educate themselves. That’s a huge factor in his favor for future success right there.

Stay strong.

11 07 2009
grayrose76

This is a good entry! I am going to chime in with description of PDD-NOS, since that’s what my son is.

I think PDD-NOS covers the widest part of the spectrum and the kids in this range have a variety of outcomes. At almost 3yo, my son has recently started developing some language, but still mostly uses individual words, though he did master a sentence lately (“I want x”). He knows who daddy is, but does not understand questions and will not respond to questions when asked. I am not sure he knows who mama is, though he does say it occasionally. Like most children with PDD-NOS, he has almost no pretend play. He does sometimes pretend to eat or drink, but does not play imaginatively with his toys.

Children with PDD-NOS usually do develop some functional language (if they don’t, they are later reclassified as having classical autism), though level of functionality varies widely. Not all PDD-NOS children can be mainstreamed in school. Some PDD-NOS children do eventually go to college; I know one young man who is doing quite well.

You will usually able to recognize a PDD-NOS child in a public place because a PDD-NOS child will often tantrum in public, and exhibit stereotypical behaviors such as hand-flapping, rocking, spinning around, headbanging, etc. A PDD-NOS child will usually have poor eye contact, will not initiate any contact with strangers, and will usually ignore them.

In terms of physical development, most PDD-NOS children are developmentally delayed in that area as well. They will probably have trouble riding bicycles, participating in sports that require extensive goal planning, etc.

11 07 2009
grayrose76

This is a good entry! I am going to chime in with description of PDD-NOS, since that’s what my son is.

I think PDD-NOS covers the widest part of the spectrum and the kids in this range have a variety of outcomes. At almost 3yo, my son has recently started developing some language, but still mostly uses individual words, though he did master a sentence lately (“I want x”). He knows who daddy is, but does not understand questions and will not respond to questions when asked. I am not sure he knows who mama is, though he does say it occasionally. Like most children with PDD-NOS, he has almost no pretend play. He does sometimes pretend to eat or drink, but does not play imaginatively with his toys.

Children with PDD-NOS usually do develop some functional language (if they don’t, they are later reclassified as having classical autism), though level of functionality varies widely. Not all PDD-NOS children can be mainstreamed in school. Some PDD-NOS children do eventually go to college; I know one young man who is doing quite well.

You will usually able to recognize a PDD-NOS child in a public place because a PDD-NOS child will often tantrum in public, and exhibit stereotypical behaviors such as hand-flapping, rocking, spinning around, headbanging, etc. A PDD-NOS child will usually have poor eye contact, will not initiate any contact with strangers, and will usually ignore them.

In terms of physical development, most PDD-NOS children are developmentally delayed in that area as well. They will probably have trouble riding bicycles, participating in sports that require extensive goal planning, etc.

11 07 2009
grayrose76

This is a good entry! I am going to chime in with description of PDD-NOS, since that’s what my son is.

I think PDD-NOS covers the widest part of the spectrum and the kids in this range have a variety of outcomes. At almost 3yo, my son has recently started developing some language, but still mostly uses individual words, though he did master a sentence lately (“I want x”). He knows who daddy is, but does not understand questions and will not respond to questions when asked. I am not sure he knows who mama is, though he does say it occasionally. Like most children with PDD-NOS, he has almost no pretend play. He does sometimes pretend to eat or drink, but does not play imaginatively with his toys.

Children with PDD-NOS usually do develop some functional language (if they don’t, they are later reclassified as having classical autism), though level of functionality varies widely. Not all PDD-NOS children can be mainstreamed in school. Some PDD-NOS children do eventually go to college; I know one young man who is doing quite well.

You will usually able to recognize a PDD-NOS child in a public place because a PDD-NOS child will often tantrum in public, and exhibit stereotypical behaviors such as hand-flapping, rocking, spinning around, headbanging, etc. A PDD-NOS child will usually have poor eye contact, will not initiate any contact with strangers, and will usually ignore them.

In terms of physical development, most PDD-NOS children are developmentally delayed in that area as well. They will probably have trouble riding bicycles, participating in sports that require extensive goal planning, etc.

11 07 2009
grayrose76

This is a good entry! I am going to chime in with description of PDD-NOS, since that’s what my son is.

I think PDD-NOS covers the widest part of the spectrum and the kids in this range have a variety of outcomes. At almost 3yo, my son has recently started developing some language, but still mostly uses individual words, though he did master a sentence lately (“I want x”). He knows who daddy is, but does not understand questions and will not respond to questions when asked. I am not sure he knows who mama is, though he does say it occasionally. Like most children with PDD-NOS, he has almost no pretend play. He does sometimes pretend to eat or drink, but does not play imaginatively with his toys.

Children with PDD-NOS usually do develop some functional language (if they don’t, they are later reclassified as having classical autism), though level of functionality varies widely. Not all PDD-NOS children can be mainstreamed in school. Some PDD-NOS children do eventually go to college; I know one young man who is doing quite well.

You will usually able to recognize a PDD-NOS child in a public place because a PDD-NOS child will often tantrum in public, and exhibit stereotypical behaviors such as hand-flapping, rocking, spinning around, headbanging, etc. A PDD-NOS child will usually have poor eye contact, will not initiate any contact with strangers, and will usually ignore them.

In terms of physical development, most PDD-NOS children are developmentally delayed in that area as well. They will probably have trouble riding bicycles, participating in sports that require extensive goal planning, etc.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for the information. I read a little about PDD-NOS when we started the diagnostic process for my son.

Good luck to you and your boy. He’s got parents who care and who are willing to educate themselves. That’s a huge factor in his favor for future success right there.

Stay strong.

11 07 2009
grayrose76

This is a good entry! I am going to chime in with description of PDD-NOS, since that’s what my son is.

I think PDD-NOS covers the widest part of the spectrum and the kids in this range have a variety of outcomes. At almost 3yo, my son has recently started developing some language, but still mostly uses individual words, though he did master a sentence lately (“I want x”). He knows who daddy is, but does not understand questions and will not respond to questions when asked. I am not sure he knows who mama is, though he does say it occasionally. Like most children with PDD-NOS, he has almost no pretend play. He does sometimes pretend to eat or drink, but does not play imaginatively with his toys.

Children with PDD-NOS usually do develop some functional language (if they don’t, they are later reclassified as having classical autism), though level of functionality varies widely. Not all PDD-NOS children can be mainstreamed in school. Some PDD-NOS children do eventually go to college; I know one young man who is doing quite well.

You will usually able to recognize a PDD-NOS child in a public place because a PDD-NOS child will often tantrum in public, and exhibit stereotypical behaviors such as hand-flapping, rocking, spinning around, headbanging, etc. A PDD-NOS child will usually have poor eye contact, will not initiate any contact with strangers, and will usually ignore them.

In terms of physical development, most PDD-NOS children are developmentally delayed in that area as well. They will probably have trouble riding bicycles, participating in sports that require extensive goal planning, etc.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for the information. I read a little about PDD-NOS when we started the diagnostic process for my son.

Good luck to you and your boy. He’s got parents who care and who are willing to educate themselves. That’s a huge factor in his favor for future success right there.

Stay strong.

11 07 2009
grayrose76

This is a good entry! I am going to chime in with description of PDD-NOS, since that’s what my son is.
I think PDD-NOS covers the widest part of the spectrum and the kids in this range have a variety of outcomes. At almost 3yo, my son has recently started developing some language, but still mostly uses individual words, though he did master a sentence lately (“I want x”). He knows who daddy is, but does not understand questions and will not respond to questions when asked. I am not sure he knows who mama is, though he does say it occasionally. Like most children with PDD-NOS, he has almost no pretend play. He does sometimes pretend to eat or drink, but does not play imaginatively with his toys.
Children with PDD-NOS usually do develop some functional language (if they don’t, they are later reclassified as having classical autism), though level of functionality varies widely. Not all PDD-NOS children can be mainstreamed in school. Some PDD-NOS children do eventually go to college; I know one young man who is doing quite well.
You will usually able to recognize a PDD-NOS child in a public place because a PDD-NOS child will often tantrum in public, and exhibit stereotypical behaviors such as hand-flapping, rocking, spinning around, headbanging, etc. A PDD-NOS child will usually have poor eye contact, will not initiate any contact with strangers, and will usually ignore them.
In terms of physical development, most PDD-NOS children are developmentally delayed in that area as well. They will probably have trouble riding bicycles, participating in sports that require extensive goal planning, etc.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for the information. I read a little about PDD-NOS when we started the diagnostic process for my son.
Good luck to you and your boy. He’s got parents who care and who are willing to educate themselves. That’s a huge factor in his favor for future success right there.
Stay strong.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for the information. I read a little about PDD-NOS when we started the diagnostic process for my son.
Good luck to you and your boy. He’s got parents who care and who are willing to educate themselves. That’s a huge factor in his favor for future success right there.
Stay strong.

11 07 2009
grayrose76

This is a good entry! I am going to chime in with description of PDD-NOS, since that’s what my son is.
I think PDD-NOS covers the widest part of the spectrum and the kids in this range have a variety of outcomes. At almost 3yo, my son has recently started developing some language, but still mostly uses individual words, though he did master a sentence lately (“I want x”). He knows who daddy is, but does not understand questions and will not respond to questions when asked. I am not sure he knows who mama is, though he does say it occasionally. Like most children with PDD-NOS, he has almost no pretend play. He does sometimes pretend to eat or drink, but does not play imaginatively with his toys.
Children with PDD-NOS usually do develop some functional language (if they don’t, they are later reclassified as having classical autism), though level of functionality varies widely. Not all PDD-NOS children can be mainstreamed in school. Some PDD-NOS children do eventually go to college; I know one young man who is doing quite well.
You will usually able to recognize a PDD-NOS child in a public place because a PDD-NOS child will often tantrum in public, and exhibit stereotypical behaviors such as hand-flapping, rocking, spinning around, headbanging, etc. A PDD-NOS child will usually have poor eye contact, will not initiate any contact with strangers, and will usually ignore them.
In terms of physical development, most PDD-NOS children are developmentally delayed in that area as well. They will probably have trouble riding bicycles, participating in sports that require extensive goal planning, etc.

11 07 2009
purpletigron

Can you address the differences in prevalence, and how females and males present with autism-spectrum disorders?

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I know it is more prevalent in boys. I’m not sure why this is, there’s no official medical explanation that I’ve read, just a bunch of theories.

I used to work as a volunteer for our church’s two year old preschool with my wife and we noticed that little girls seemed naturally more inclined to be social than little boys even at that young age. They usually speak clearer earlier. They also tend to pay more attention to facial expressions naturally from some stuff I’ve read. That could have something to do with the difference in prevalenc, I think.

http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/38/13/17

As far as a difference in the way it presents itself in boys vs. girls, I’m not sure. Back in college I worked with a few special education programs here in the Birmingham, AL area and I worked with lots of autistic boys, but not a single autistic girl. I have no first-hand experience there.

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Autism in girls is missed?

I have read recently that a lot of girls on the autism spectrum may be being missed.

The idea presented is that girls tend to present differently from boys. But this doesn’t mean they do not suffer with autism-spectrum disorders.

The suggestion was that a lot of girls are suffering because the professionals don’t know how to recognise, diagnose and treat autism as females tend to present.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

I can see that. I found this story from Nightline addressing this situation: http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=4177353&page=1

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

Thank you for that link!

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

Thank you for that link!

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

I can see that. I found this story from Nightline addressing this situation: http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=4177353&page=1

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Autism in girls is missed?

I have read recently that a lot of girls on the autism spectrum may be being missed.

The idea presented is that girls tend to present differently from boys. But this doesn’t mean they do not suffer with autism-spectrum disorders.

The suggestion was that a lot of girls are suffering because the professionals don’t know how to recognise, diagnose and treat autism as females tend to present.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I know it is more prevalent in boys. I’m not sure why this is, there’s no official medical explanation that I’ve read, just a bunch of theories.

I used to work as a volunteer for our church’s two year old preschool with my wife and we noticed that little girls seemed naturally more inclined to be social than little boys even at that young age. They usually speak clearer earlier. They also tend to pay more attention to facial expressions naturally from some stuff I’ve read. That could have something to do with the difference in prevalenc, I think.

http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/38/13/17

As far as a difference in the way it presents itself in boys vs. girls, I’m not sure. Back in college I worked with a few special education programs here in the Birmingham, AL area and I worked with lots of autistic boys, but not a single autistic girl. I have no first-hand experience there.

11 07 2009
purpletigron

Can you address the differences in prevalence, and how females and males present with autism-spectrum disorders?

11 07 2009
purpletigron

Can you address the differences in prevalence, and how females and males present with autism-spectrum disorders?

11 07 2009
purpletigron

Can you address the differences in prevalence, and how females and males present with autism-spectrum disorders?

11 07 2009
purpletigron

Can you address the differences in prevalence, and how females and males present with autism-spectrum disorders?

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I know it is more prevalent in boys. I’m not sure why this is, there’s no official medical explanation that I’ve read, just a bunch of theories.

I used to work as a volunteer for our church’s two year old preschool with my wife and we noticed that little girls seemed naturally more inclined to be social than little boys even at that young age. They usually speak clearer earlier. They also tend to pay more attention to facial expressions naturally from some stuff I’ve read. That could have something to do with the difference in prevalenc, I think.

http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/38/13/17

As far as a difference in the way it presents itself in boys vs. girls, I’m not sure. Back in college I worked with a few special education programs here in the Birmingham, AL area and I worked with lots of autistic boys, but not a single autistic girl. I have no first-hand experience there.

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Autism in girls is missed?

I have read recently that a lot of girls on the autism spectrum may be being missed.

The idea presented is that girls tend to present differently from boys. But this doesn’t mean they do not suffer with autism-spectrum disorders.

The suggestion was that a lot of girls are suffering because the professionals don’t know how to recognise, diagnose and treat autism as females tend to present.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

I can see that. I found this story from Nightline addressing this situation: http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=4177353&page=1

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

Thank you for that link!

11 07 2009
purpletigron

Can you address the differences in prevalence, and how females and males present with autism-spectrum disorders?

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I know it is more prevalent in boys. I’m not sure why this is, there’s no official medical explanation that I’ve read, just a bunch of theories.

I used to work as a volunteer for our church’s two year old preschool with my wife and we noticed that little girls seemed naturally more inclined to be social than little boys even at that young age. They usually speak clearer earlier. They also tend to pay more attention to facial expressions naturally from some stuff I’ve read. That could have something to do with the difference in prevalenc, I think.

http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/38/13/17

As far as a difference in the way it presents itself in boys vs. girls, I’m not sure. Back in college I worked with a few special education programs here in the Birmingham, AL area and I worked with lots of autistic boys, but not a single autistic girl. I have no first-hand experience there.

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Autism in girls is missed?

I have read recently that a lot of girls on the autism spectrum may be being missed.

The idea presented is that girls tend to present differently from boys. But this doesn’t mean they do not suffer with autism-spectrum disorders.

The suggestion was that a lot of girls are suffering because the professionals don’t know how to recognise, diagnose and treat autism as females tend to present.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

I can see that. I found this story from Nightline addressing this situation: http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=4177353&page=1

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

Thank you for that link!

11 07 2009
purpletigron

Can you address the differences in prevalence, and how females and males present with autism-spectrum disorders?

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I know it is more prevalent in boys. I’m not sure why this is, there’s no official medical explanation that I’ve read, just a bunch of theories.
I used to work as a volunteer for our church’s two year old preschool with my wife and we noticed that little girls seemed naturally more inclined to be social than little boys even at that young age. They usually speak clearer earlier. They also tend to pay more attention to facial expressions naturally from some stuff I’ve read. That could have something to do with the difference in prevalenc, I think.
http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/38/13/17
As far as a difference in the way it presents itself in boys vs. girls, I’m not sure. Back in college I worked with a few special education programs here in the Birmingham, AL area and I worked with lots of autistic boys, but not a single autistic girl. I have no first-hand experience there.

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Autism in girls is missed?
I have read recently that a lot of girls on the autism spectrum may be being missed.
The idea presented is that girls tend to present differently from boys. But this doesn’t mean they do not suffer with autism-spectrum disorders.
The suggestion was that a lot of girls are suffering because the professionals don’t know how to recognise, diagnose and treat autism as females tend to present.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Re: Autism in girls is missed?
I can see that. I found this story from Nightline addressing this situation: http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=4177353&page=1

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Re: Autism in girls is missed?
Thank you for that link!

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Re: Autism in girls is missed?
Thank you for that link!

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Re: Autism in girls is missed?
I can see that. I found this story from Nightline addressing this situation: http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=4177353&page=1

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Autism in girls is missed?
I have read recently that a lot of girls on the autism spectrum may be being missed.
The idea presented is that girls tend to present differently from boys. But this doesn’t mean they do not suffer with autism-spectrum disorders.
The suggestion was that a lot of girls are suffering because the professionals don’t know how to recognise, diagnose and treat autism as females tend to present.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I know it is more prevalent in boys. I’m not sure why this is, there’s no official medical explanation that I’ve read, just a bunch of theories.
I used to work as a volunteer for our church’s two year old preschool with my wife and we noticed that little girls seemed naturally more inclined to be social than little boys even at that young age. They usually speak clearer earlier. They also tend to pay more attention to facial expressions naturally from some stuff I’ve read. That could have something to do with the difference in prevalenc, I think.
http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/38/13/17
As far as a difference in the way it presents itself in boys vs. girls, I’m not sure. Back in college I worked with a few special education programs here in the Birmingham, AL area and I worked with lots of autistic boys, but not a single autistic girl. I have no first-hand experience there.

11 07 2009
purpletigron

Can you address the differences in prevalence, and how females and males present with autism-spectrum disorders?

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Same here. I wonder if we can’t all find ourselves in the spectrum, everyone needing some degree of help to understand others and make ourselves understood, to get along, to cope with change, etc.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Same here. I wonder if we can’t all find ourselves in the spectrum, everyone needing some degree of help to understand others and make ourselves understood, to get along, to cope with change, etc.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

“I think this topic deserves more attention.”

You and many of your readers too are writers. Why not bring attention to autism, other developmental disabilities and mental illness in fiction? How do we dispel stereotypes and misconceptions? What are the pros and cons of dealing with these issues in different genres — crime, horror, sf, mainstream… — in children’s, YA, or adult fiction? Who has done this in the past, and where can we find their work?

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I’ve been finding myself doing this lately.

In “The Dreamer Awakes” (http://everydayweirdness.com/e/20090212/) for example, one of the stories in my Fountain series, the protagonist is written as someone with Asperger’s. He relates better to his (possibly) imaginary gods and goddesses than other people. He feels safest in the library. He has a hard time relating to “real” people. I put it in there with some subtlety, I hope, but it was done on purpose.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Thanks, TJ. I have a story that I plan to develop into a YA novella, eventually. It’s about a young man with Asperger’s in the 1930s. It’s not diagnosed, of course, but I want to be authentic from his POV and responsible as a writer. I’ll be sure to run any questions by you. Thanks in advance.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Thanks, TJ. I have a story that I plan to develop into a YA novella, eventually. It’s about a young man with Asperger’s in the 1930s. It’s not diagnosed, of course, but I want to be authentic from his POV and responsible as a writer. I’ll be sure to run any questions by you. Thanks in advance.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I’ve been finding myself doing this lately.

In “The Dreamer Awakes” (http://everydayweirdness.com/e/20090212/) for example, one of the stories in my Fountain series, the protagonist is written as someone with Asperger’s. He relates better to his (possibly) imaginary gods and goddesses than other people. He feels safest in the library. He has a hard time relating to “real” people. I put it in there with some subtlety, I hope, but it was done on purpose.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

“I think this topic deserves more attention.”

You and many of your readers too are writers. Why not bring attention to autism, other developmental disabilities and mental illness in fiction? How do we dispel stereotypes and misconceptions? What are the pros and cons of dealing with these issues in different genres — crime, horror, sf, mainstream… — in children’s, YA, or adult fiction? Who has done this in the past, and where can we find their work?

11 07 2009
bearleyport

“I think this topic deserves more attention.”

You and many of your readers too are writers. Why not bring attention to autism, other developmental disabilities and mental illness in fiction? How do we dispel stereotypes and misconceptions? What are the pros and cons of dealing with these issues in different genres — crime, horror, sf, mainstream… — in children’s, YA, or adult fiction? Who has done this in the past, and where can we find their work?

11 07 2009
bearleyport

“I think this topic deserves more attention.”

You and many of your readers too are writers. Why not bring attention to autism, other developmental disabilities and mental illness in fiction? How do we dispel stereotypes and misconceptions? What are the pros and cons of dealing with these issues in different genres — crime, horror, sf, mainstream… — in children’s, YA, or adult fiction? Who has done this in the past, and where can we find their work?

11 07 2009
bearleyport

“I think this topic deserves more attention.”

You and many of your readers too are writers. Why not bring attention to autism, other developmental disabilities and mental illness in fiction? How do we dispel stereotypes and misconceptions? What are the pros and cons of dealing with these issues in different genres — crime, horror, sf, mainstream… — in children’s, YA, or adult fiction? Who has done this in the past, and where can we find their work?

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I’ve been finding myself doing this lately.

In “The Dreamer Awakes” (http://everydayweirdness.com/e/20090212/) for example, one of the stories in my Fountain series, the protagonist is written as someone with Asperger’s. He relates better to his (possibly) imaginary gods and goddesses than other people. He feels safest in the library. He has a hard time relating to “real” people. I put it in there with some subtlety, I hope, but it was done on purpose.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Thanks, TJ. I have a story that I plan to develop into a YA novella, eventually. It’s about a young man with Asperger’s in the 1930s. It’s not diagnosed, of course, but I want to be authentic from his POV and responsible as a writer. I’ll be sure to run any questions by you. Thanks in advance.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

“I think this topic deserves more attention.”

You and many of your readers too are writers. Why not bring attention to autism, other developmental disabilities and mental illness in fiction? How do we dispel stereotypes and misconceptions? What are the pros and cons of dealing with these issues in different genres — crime, horror, sf, mainstream… — in children’s, YA, or adult fiction? Who has done this in the past, and where can we find their work?

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I’ve been finding myself doing this lately.

In “The Dreamer Awakes” (http://everydayweirdness.com/e/20090212/) for example, one of the stories in my Fountain series, the protagonist is written as someone with Asperger’s. He relates better to his (possibly) imaginary gods and goddesses than other people. He feels safest in the library. He has a hard time relating to “real” people. I put it in there with some subtlety, I hope, but it was done on purpose.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Thanks, TJ. I have a story that I plan to develop into a YA novella, eventually. It’s about a young man with Asperger’s in the 1930s. It’s not diagnosed, of course, but I want to be authentic from his POV and responsible as a writer. I’ll be sure to run any questions by you. Thanks in advance.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

“I think this topic deserves more attention.”
You and many of your readers too are writers. Why not bring attention to autism, other developmental disabilities and mental illness in fiction? How do we dispel stereotypes and misconceptions? What are the pros and cons of dealing with these issues in different genres — crime, horror, sf, mainstream… — in children’s, YA, or adult fiction? Who has done this in the past, and where can we find their work?

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I’ve been finding myself doing this lately.
In “The Dreamer Awakes” (http://everydayweirdness.com/e/20090212/) for example, one of the stories in my Fountain series, the protagonist is written as someone with Asperger’s. He relates better to his (possibly) imaginary gods and goddesses than other people. He feels safest in the library. He has a hard time relating to “real” people. I put it in there with some subtlety, I hope, but it was done on purpose.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Thanks, TJ. I have a story that I plan to develop into a YA novella, eventually. It’s about a young man with Asperger’s in the 1930s. It’s not diagnosed, of course, but I want to be authentic from his POV and responsible as a writer. I’ll be sure to run any questions by you. Thanks in advance.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Thanks, TJ. I have a story that I plan to develop into a YA novella, eventually. It’s about a young man with Asperger’s in the 1930s. It’s not diagnosed, of course, but I want to be authentic from his POV and responsible as a writer. I’ll be sure to run any questions by you. Thanks in advance.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I’ve been finding myself doing this lately.
In “The Dreamer Awakes” (http://everydayweirdness.com/e/20090212/) for example, one of the stories in my Fountain series, the protagonist is written as someone with Asperger’s. He relates better to his (possibly) imaginary gods and goddesses than other people. He feels safest in the library. He has a hard time relating to “real” people. I put it in there with some subtlety, I hope, but it was done on purpose.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

“I think this topic deserves more attention.”
You and many of your readers too are writers. Why not bring attention to autism, other developmental disabilities and mental illness in fiction? How do we dispel stereotypes and misconceptions? What are the pros and cons of dealing with these issues in different genres — crime, horror, sf, mainstream… — in children’s, YA, or adult fiction? Who has done this in the past, and where can we find their work?

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I believe it. I think there are lots of Aspies out there who are undiagnosed (myself included).

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I believe it. I think there are lots of Aspies out there who are undiagnosed (myself included).

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for the information. I read a little about PDD-NOS when we started the diagnostic process for my son.

Good luck to you and your boy. He’s got parents who care and who are willing to educate themselves. That’s a huge factor in his favor for future success right there.

Stay strong.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for the information. I read a little about PDD-NOS when we started the diagnostic process for my son.

Good luck to you and your boy. He’s got parents who care and who are willing to educate themselves. That’s a huge factor in his favor for future success right there.

Stay strong.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I know it is more prevalent in boys. I’m not sure why this is, there’s no official medical explanation that I’ve read, just a bunch of theories.

I used to work as a volunteer for our church’s two year old preschool with my wife and we noticed that little girls seemed naturally more inclined to be social than little boys even at that young age. They usually speak clearer earlier. They also tend to pay more attention to facial expressions naturally from some stuff I’ve read. That could have something to do with the difference in prevalenc, I think.

http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/38/13/17

As far as a difference in the way it presents itself in boys vs. girls, I’m not sure. Back in college I worked with a few special education programs here in the Birmingham, AL area and I worked with lots of autistic boys, but not a single autistic girl. I have no first-hand experience there.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I know it is more prevalent in boys. I’m not sure why this is, there’s no official medical explanation that I’ve read, just a bunch of theories.

I used to work as a volunteer for our church’s two year old preschool with my wife and we noticed that little girls seemed naturally more inclined to be social than little boys even at that young age. They usually speak clearer earlier. They also tend to pay more attention to facial expressions naturally from some stuff I’ve read. That could have something to do with the difference in prevalenc, I think.

http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/38/13/17

As far as a difference in the way it presents itself in boys vs. girls, I’m not sure. Back in college I worked with a few special education programs here in the Birmingham, AL area and I worked with lots of autistic boys, but not a single autistic girl. I have no first-hand experience there.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I’ve been finding myself doing this lately.

In “The Dreamer Awakes” (http://everydayweirdness.com/e/20090212/) for example, one of the stories in my Fountain series, the protagonist is written as someone with Asperger’s. He relates better to his (possibly) imaginary gods and goddesses than other people. He feels safest in the library. He has a hard time relating to “real” people. I put it in there with some subtlety, I hope, but it was done on purpose.

11 07 2009
southernweirdo

I’ve been finding myself doing this lately.

In “The Dreamer Awakes” (http://everydayweirdness.com/e/20090212/) for example, one of the stories in my Fountain series, the protagonist is written as someone with Asperger’s. He relates better to his (possibly) imaginary gods and goddesses than other people. He feels safest in the library. He has a hard time relating to “real” people. I put it in there with some subtlety, I hope, but it was done on purpose.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Thanks, TJ. I have a story that I plan to develop into a YA novella, eventually. It’s about a young man with Asperger’s in the 1930s. It’s not diagnosed, of course, but I want to be authentic from his POV and responsible as a writer. I’ll be sure to run any questions by you. Thanks in advance.

11 07 2009
bearleyport

Thanks, TJ. I have a story that I plan to develop into a YA novella, eventually. It’s about a young man with Asperger’s in the 1930s. It’s not diagnosed, of course, but I want to be authentic from his POV and responsible as a writer. I’ll be sure to run any questions by you. Thanks in advance.

12 07 2009
wendigomountain

My son has problems at school. Not of the academic variety, but of the social variety. They’ve been kicking the word Asbergers around for a while though he hasn’t been officially diagnosed. I hope you don’t mind me friending your LJ, since there’s some great stuff here. Thanks for the links.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Of course. If you have any questions feel free to send me a private message or you can email me @ rumples06_at_hotmail.com.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Of course. If you have any questions feel free to send me a private message or you can email me @ rumples06_at_hotmail.com.

12 07 2009
wendigomountain

My son has problems at school. Not of the academic variety, but of the social variety. They’ve been kicking the word Asbergers around for a while though he hasn’t been officially diagnosed. I hope you don’t mind me friending your LJ, since there’s some great stuff here. Thanks for the links.

12 07 2009
wendigomountain

My son has problems at school. Not of the academic variety, but of the social variety. They’ve been kicking the word Asbergers around for a while though he hasn’t been officially diagnosed. I hope you don’t mind me friending your LJ, since there’s some great stuff here. Thanks for the links.

12 07 2009
wendigomountain

My son has problems at school. Not of the academic variety, but of the social variety. They’ve been kicking the word Asbergers around for a while though he hasn’t been officially diagnosed. I hope you don’t mind me friending your LJ, since there’s some great stuff here. Thanks for the links.

12 07 2009
wendigomountain

My son has problems at school. Not of the academic variety, but of the social variety. They’ve been kicking the word Asbergers around for a while though he hasn’t been officially diagnosed. I hope you don’t mind me friending your LJ, since there’s some great stuff here. Thanks for the links.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Of course. If you have any questions feel free to send me a private message or you can email me @ rumples06_at_hotmail.com.

12 07 2009
wendigomountain

My son has problems at school. Not of the academic variety, but of the social variety. They’ve been kicking the word Asbergers around for a while though he hasn’t been officially diagnosed. I hope you don’t mind me friending your LJ, since there’s some great stuff here. Thanks for the links.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Of course. If you have any questions feel free to send me a private message or you can email me @ rumples06_at_hotmail.com.

12 07 2009
wendigomountain

My son has problems at school. Not of the academic variety, but of the social variety. They’ve been kicking the word Asbergers around for a while though he hasn’t been officially diagnosed. I hope you don’t mind me friending your LJ, since there’s some great stuff here. Thanks for the links.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Of course. If you have any questions feel free to send me a private message or you can email me @ rumples06_at_hotmail.com.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Of course. If you have any questions feel free to send me a private message or you can email me @ rumples06_at_hotmail.com.

12 07 2009
wendigomountain

My son has problems at school. Not of the academic variety, but of the social variety. They’ve been kicking the word Asbergers around for a while though he hasn’t been officially diagnosed. I hope you don’t mind me friending your LJ, since there’s some great stuff here. Thanks for the links.

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Autism in girls is missed?

I have read recently that a lot of girls on the autism spectrum may be being missed.

The idea presented is that girls tend to present differently from boys. But this doesn’t mean they do not suffer with autism-spectrum disorders.

The suggestion was that a lot of girls are suffering because the professionals don’t know how to recognise, diagnose and treat autism as females tend to present.

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Autism in girls is missed?

I have read recently that a lot of girls on the autism spectrum may be being missed.

The idea presented is that girls tend to present differently from boys. But this doesn’t mean they do not suffer with autism-spectrum disorders.

The suggestion was that a lot of girls are suffering because the professionals don’t know how to recognise, diagnose and treat autism as females tend to present.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

I can see that. I found this story from Nightline addressing this situation: http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=4177353&page=1

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

I can see that. I found this story from Nightline addressing this situation: http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=4177353&page=1

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Of course. If you have any questions feel free to send me a private message or you can email me @ rumples06_at_hotmail.com.

12 07 2009
southernweirdo

Of course. If you have any questions feel free to send me a private message or you can email me @ rumples06_at_hotmail.com.

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

Thank you for that link!

12 07 2009
purpletigron

Re: Autism in girls is missed?

Thank you for that link!

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