Question about the movie 9 for LJ hive mind…

12 09 2009

My son really wants to see the new movie 9, and I would like to take him. The commercials have been in heavy rotation on Nickelodeon. He loves the original short movie available online, and has been busy sculpting the characters from Sculpey clay for weeks. He is excited about every new preview. However, the PG-13 rating concerns me; I don’t want him to have nightmares.

Has anyone out there seen 9 yet? How violent/scary is it? Would you feel comfortable taking a 6-year-old to the film?

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55 responses

12 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

Hey, T.J. I’m glad you posted about 9 because the wife and I have had several conversations about taking our kids (6 and 4). Both of them are very interested. I’ve shown them the short film. We’ve watched some of the released clips (especially the “winged beast” scene). We’ve taken great pains to talk to both our children about how dark it is and that, yes, there appears to be creepy and dark and scary parts.

Then the response we’ve gotten each time has been, “But 9 and the others save the world. That’s good, right? They’re trying to help rescue the humans, and that makes it good.”

In many ways, it’s hard to argue with that child-logic. Does that mean we rock the Devil’s Rejects with them? Nope. Coraline, which runs the dark yet perhaps slightly vanilla gamut? They’ve seen the commercials for Coraline, for instance, and have stated that “It looks creepy” and that they don’t want to watch it. However, they are fascinated by those little stitchpunk creatures of 9, and my daughter loves that 7, the female one who wears the bird skull, is a warrior-girl, as she puts it.

It’s been something that the wife and I have taken all into consideration, and we’ve worked really hard sitting down with our kids and doing running commentaries, of sorts, with movies around them. Things like “We don’t say that” or “We don’t do that” and talk about why afterwards. Heck, edited on Bravo last night was Matrix: Reloaded, and my son hung in there watching it. Little cuss broke down sobbing when the Keymaker was shot and killed but was understanding that it was done as a part of his purpose in helping Neo.

I’m rambling. It’s a hard call, I know. But from what I’ve gathered emailing and blogging with you over the past (nearly) couple of years, T.J., is that you and your wife don’t (and won’t) leave your own young ones hanging. If the overarching theme of 9 revolves around the good overcoming evil motif and that, yes, many dark things happen along the way, then maybe it’s better exposing kids to that at a formative age when we can coach them through the rough parts.

Just like reading, say, about some witch fattening up little lost kids in some forest so that she can bake them in the oven. And even in sanitized fairy tale retellings, kids the ages of our own children tend to “get” on that most primal/basal level.

12 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

Hey, T.J. I’m glad you posted about 9 because the wife and I have had several conversations about taking our kids (6 and 4). Both of them are very interested. I’ve shown them the short film. We’ve watched some of the released clips (especially the “winged beast” scene). We’ve taken great pains to talk to both our children about how dark it is and that, yes, there appears to be creepy and dark and scary parts.

Then the response we’ve gotten each time has been, “But 9 and the others save the world. That’s good, right? They’re trying to help rescue the humans, and that makes it good.”

In many ways, it’s hard to argue with that child-logic. Does that mean we rock the Devil’s Rejects with them? Nope. Coraline, which runs the dark yet perhaps slightly vanilla gamut? They’ve seen the commercials for Coraline, for instance, and have stated that “It looks creepy” and that they don’t want to watch it. However, they are fascinated by those little stitchpunk creatures of 9, and my daughter loves that 7, the female one who wears the bird skull, is a warrior-girl, as she puts it.

It’s been something that the wife and I have taken all into consideration, and we’ve worked really hard sitting down with our kids and doing running commentaries, of sorts, with movies around them. Things like “We don’t say that” or “We don’t do that” and talk about why afterwards. Heck, edited on Bravo last night was Matrix: Reloaded, and my son hung in there watching it. Little cuss broke down sobbing when the Keymaker was shot and killed but was understanding that it was done as a part of his purpose in helping Neo.

I’m rambling. It’s a hard call, I know. But from what I’ve gathered emailing and blogging with you over the past (nearly) couple of years, T.J., is that you and your wife don’t (and won’t) leave your own young ones hanging. If the overarching theme of 9 revolves around the good overcoming evil motif and that, yes, many dark things happen along the way, then maybe it’s better exposing kids to that at a formative age when we can coach them through the rough parts.

Just like reading, say, about some witch fattening up little lost kids in some forest so that she can bake them in the oven. And even in sanitized fairy tale retellings, kids the ages of our own children tend to “get” on that most primal/basal level.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

I found this link: http://www.parentpreviews.com/movie_reviews/nine/

They gave it a C+ based on violent content.

I worry about how graphic the corpses might be represented, but at the same time, my son loves th the zombie stuff in Halloween displays. *shrugging shoulders*

It states “characters have their eyes burned out.” Are we talking the stichpunk guys or actual humans? If humans, that may be a bit too much for my son. He has a thing about eyeballs.

I will let him see it one day, one way or another. I’m just really trying to determine if the theatre is the right place, or if I should wait till it comes out on DVD?

He’s really impatient to see it. If I hear from others I trust that it’s okay, we will see it sometime this week, otherwise, he’ll just have to wait.

12 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

Hey, man. We just got back from seeing it.

The theater was packed. Lots of families and a good many little kids. Same as another poster down-thread–no crying. The eyeball thing? A non-issue. It’s the stitchpunk characters, and it’s their life essence being drained from their eyes and mouth.

Now, the imagery is dark. There are a few scenes involving human corpses, but nothing overt.

I’ll start with Thing 2 (daughter): Overall, the movie’s imagery didn’t faze her one way or the other.

Thing 1 (son): He was rapt with it all. Totally into it.

Both kids loved 7, the female warrior. The twins, 3 and 4, were cutesy but not over the top.

The ending is redemptive but not happy-go-lucky.

I’d say the scariest parts are the winged beast scene and the seamstress scene. The seamstress is a machine that has a flaring hood a la a cobra, and it hypnotizes the characters with a “borrowed” body of one of their brethren. Still, neither of my kids got shaken up at any point in the movie, and that really surprised me.

All in all, none of my initial concerns over the dark/violent images manifested.

Hope all that helps, T.J. Things like this are often a hard call, to be sure.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Sounds great! Thanks!

I hope to be able to take him some night this week after work as a reward if he gets “all happy faces” from the teacher for the day.

13 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

You’re welcome.

It’s amazing how those smiley faces can motivate the kids, huh?

12 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

Hey, T.J. I’m glad you posted about 9 because the wife and I have had several conversations about taking our kids (6 and 4). Both of them are very interested. I’ve shown them the short film. We’ve watched some of the released clips (especially the “winged beast” scene). We’ve taken great pains to talk to both our children about how dark it is and that, yes, there appears to be creepy and dark and scary parts.

Then the response we’ve gotten each time has been, “But 9 and the others save the world. That’s good, right? They’re trying to help rescue the humans, and that makes it good.”

In many ways, it’s hard to argue with that child-logic. Does that mean we rock the Devil’s Rejects with them? Nope. Coraline, which runs the dark yet perhaps slightly vanilla gamut? They’ve seen the commercials for Coraline, for instance, and have stated that “It looks creepy” and that they don’t want to watch it. However, they are fascinated by those little stitchpunk creatures of 9, and my daughter loves that 7, the female one who wears the bird skull, is a warrior-girl, as she puts it.

It’s been something that the wife and I have taken all into consideration, and we’ve worked really hard sitting down with our kids and doing running commentaries, of sorts, with movies around them. Things like “We don’t say that” or “We don’t do that” and talk about why afterwards. Heck, edited on Bravo last night was Matrix: Reloaded, and my son hung in there watching it. Little cuss broke down sobbing when the Keymaker was shot and killed but was understanding that it was done as a part of his purpose in helping Neo.

I’m rambling. It’s a hard call, I know. But from what I’ve gathered emailing and blogging with you over the past (nearly) couple of years, T.J., is that you and your wife don’t (and won’t) leave your own young ones hanging. If the overarching theme of 9 revolves around the good overcoming evil motif and that, yes, many dark things happen along the way, then maybe it’s better exposing kids to that at a formative age when we can coach them through the rough parts.

Just like reading, say, about some witch fattening up little lost kids in some forest so that she can bake them in the oven. And even in sanitized fairy tale retellings, kids the ages of our own children tend to “get” on that most primal/basal level.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

I found this link: http://www.parentpreviews.com/movie_reviews/nine/

They gave it a C+ based on violent content.

I worry about how graphic the corpses might be represented, but at the same time, my son loves th the zombie stuff in Halloween displays. *shrugging shoulders*

It states “characters have their eyes burned out.” Are we talking the stichpunk guys or actual humans? If humans, that may be a bit too much for my son. He has a thing about eyeballs.

I will let him see it one day, one way or another. I’m just really trying to determine if the theatre is the right place, or if I should wait till it comes out on DVD?

He’s really impatient to see it. If I hear from others I trust that it’s okay, we will see it sometime this week, otherwise, he’ll just have to wait.

12 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

Hey, man. We just got back from seeing it.

The theater was packed. Lots of families and a good many little kids. Same as another poster down-thread–no crying. The eyeball thing? A non-issue. It’s the stitchpunk characters, and it’s their life essence being drained from their eyes and mouth.

Now, the imagery is dark. There are a few scenes involving human corpses, but nothing overt.

I’ll start with Thing 2 (daughter): Overall, the movie’s imagery didn’t faze her one way or the other.

Thing 1 (son): He was rapt with it all. Totally into it.

Both kids loved 7, the female warrior. The twins, 3 and 4, were cutesy but not over the top.

The ending is redemptive but not happy-go-lucky.

I’d say the scariest parts are the winged beast scene and the seamstress scene. The seamstress is a machine that has a flaring hood a la a cobra, and it hypnotizes the characters with a “borrowed” body of one of their brethren. Still, neither of my kids got shaken up at any point in the movie, and that really surprised me.

All in all, none of my initial concerns over the dark/violent images manifested.

Hope all that helps, T.J. Things like this are often a hard call, to be sure.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Sounds great! Thanks!

I hope to be able to take him some night this week after work as a reward if he gets “all happy faces” from the teacher for the day.

13 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

You’re welcome.

It’s amazing how those smiley faces can motivate the kids, huh?

12 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

Hey, T.J. I’m glad you posted about 9 because the wife and I have had several conversations about taking our kids (6 and 4). Both of them are very interested. I’ve shown them the short film. We’ve watched some of the released clips (especially the “winged beast” scene). We’ve taken great pains to talk to both our children about how dark it is and that, yes, there appears to be creepy and dark and scary parts.
Then the response we’ve gotten each time has been, “But 9 and the others save the world. That’s good, right? They’re trying to help rescue the humans, and that makes it good.”
In many ways, it’s hard to argue with that child-logic. Does that mean we rock the Devil’s Rejects with them? Nope. Coraline, which runs the dark yet perhaps slightly vanilla gamut? They’ve seen the commercials for Coraline, for instance, and have stated that “It looks creepy” and that they don’t want to watch it. However, they are fascinated by those little stitchpunk creatures of 9, and my daughter loves that 7, the female one who wears the bird skull, is a warrior-girl, as she puts it.
It’s been something that the wife and I have taken all into consideration, and we’ve worked really hard sitting down with our kids and doing running commentaries, of sorts, with movies around them. Things like “We don’t say that” or “We don’t do that” and talk about why afterwards. Heck, edited on Bravo last night was Matrix: Reloaded, and my son hung in there watching it. Little cuss broke down sobbing when the Keymaker was shot and killed but was understanding that it was done as a part of his purpose in helping Neo.
I’m rambling. It’s a hard call, I know. But from what I’ve gathered emailing and blogging with you over the past (nearly) couple of years, T.J., is that you and your wife don’t (and won’t) leave your own young ones hanging. If the overarching theme of 9 revolves around the good overcoming evil motif and that, yes, many dark things happen along the way, then maybe it’s better exposing kids to that at a formative age when we can coach them through the rough parts.
Just like reading, say, about some witch fattening up little lost kids in some forest so that she can bake them in the oven. And even in sanitized fairy tale retellings, kids the ages of our own children tend to “get” on that most primal/basal level.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

I found this link: http://www.parentpreviews.com/movie_reviews/nine/
They gave it a C+ based on violent content.
I worry about how graphic the corpses might be represented, but at the same time, my son loves th the zombie stuff in Halloween displays. *shrugging shoulders*
It states “characters have their eyes burned out.” Are we talking the stichpunk guys or actual humans? If humans, that may be a bit too much for my son. He has a thing about eyeballs.
I will let him see it one day, one way or another. I’m just really trying to determine if the theatre is the right place, or if I should wait till it comes out on DVD?
He’s really impatient to see it. If I hear from others I trust that it’s okay, we will see it sometime this week, otherwise, he’ll just have to wait.

12 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

Hey, man. We just got back from seeing it.
The theater was packed. Lots of families and a good many little kids. Same as another poster down-thread–no crying. The eyeball thing? A non-issue. It’s the stitchpunk characters, and it’s their life essence being drained from their eyes and mouth.
Now, the imagery is dark. There are a few scenes involving human corpses, but nothing overt.
I’ll start with Thing 2 (daughter): Overall, the movie’s imagery didn’t faze her one way or the other.
Thing 1 (son): He was rapt with it all. Totally into it.
Both kids loved 7, the female warrior. The twins, 3 and 4, were cutesy but not over the top.
The ending is redemptive but not happy-go-lucky.
I’d say the scariest parts are the winged beast scene and the seamstress scene. The seamstress is a machine that has a flaring hood a la a cobra, and it hypnotizes the characters with a “borrowed” body of one of their brethren. Still, neither of my kids got shaken up at any point in the movie, and that really surprised me.
All in all, none of my initial concerns over the dark/violent images manifested.
Hope all that helps, T.J. Things like this are often a hard call, to be sure.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Sounds great! Thanks!
I hope to be able to take him some night this week after work as a reward if he gets “all happy faces” from the teacher for the day.

13 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

You’re welcome.
It’s amazing how those smiley faces can motivate the kids, huh?

13 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

You’re welcome.
It’s amazing how those smiley faces can motivate the kids, huh?

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Sounds great! Thanks!
I hope to be able to take him some night this week after work as a reward if he gets “all happy faces” from the teacher for the day.

12 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

Hey, man. We just got back from seeing it.
The theater was packed. Lots of families and a good many little kids. Same as another poster down-thread–no crying. The eyeball thing? A non-issue. It’s the stitchpunk characters, and it’s their life essence being drained from their eyes and mouth.
Now, the imagery is dark. There are a few scenes involving human corpses, but nothing overt.
I’ll start with Thing 2 (daughter): Overall, the movie’s imagery didn’t faze her one way or the other.
Thing 1 (son): He was rapt with it all. Totally into it.
Both kids loved 7, the female warrior. The twins, 3 and 4, were cutesy but not over the top.
The ending is redemptive but not happy-go-lucky.
I’d say the scariest parts are the winged beast scene and the seamstress scene. The seamstress is a machine that has a flaring hood a la a cobra, and it hypnotizes the characters with a “borrowed” body of one of their brethren. Still, neither of my kids got shaken up at any point in the movie, and that really surprised me.
All in all, none of my initial concerns over the dark/violent images manifested.
Hope all that helps, T.J. Things like this are often a hard call, to be sure.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

I found this link: http://www.parentpreviews.com/movie_reviews/nine/
They gave it a C+ based on violent content.
I worry about how graphic the corpses might be represented, but at the same time, my son loves th the zombie stuff in Halloween displays. *shrugging shoulders*
It states “characters have their eyes burned out.” Are we talking the stichpunk guys or actual humans? If humans, that may be a bit too much for my son. He has a thing about eyeballs.
I will let him see it one day, one way or another. I’m just really trying to determine if the theatre is the right place, or if I should wait till it comes out on DVD?
He’s really impatient to see it. If I hear from others I trust that it’s okay, we will see it sometime this week, otherwise, he’ll just have to wait.

12 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

Hey, T.J. I’m glad you posted about 9 because the wife and I have had several conversations about taking our kids (6 and 4). Both of them are very interested. I’ve shown them the short film. We’ve watched some of the released clips (especially the “winged beast” scene). We’ve taken great pains to talk to both our children about how dark it is and that, yes, there appears to be creepy and dark and scary parts.
Then the response we’ve gotten each time has been, “But 9 and the others save the world. That’s good, right? They’re trying to help rescue the humans, and that makes it good.”
In many ways, it’s hard to argue with that child-logic. Does that mean we rock the Devil’s Rejects with them? Nope. Coraline, which runs the dark yet perhaps slightly vanilla gamut? They’ve seen the commercials for Coraline, for instance, and have stated that “It looks creepy” and that they don’t want to watch it. However, they are fascinated by those little stitchpunk creatures of 9, and my daughter loves that 7, the female one who wears the bird skull, is a warrior-girl, as she puts it.
It’s been something that the wife and I have taken all into consideration, and we’ve worked really hard sitting down with our kids and doing running commentaries, of sorts, with movies around them. Things like “We don’t say that” or “We don’t do that” and talk about why afterwards. Heck, edited on Bravo last night was Matrix: Reloaded, and my son hung in there watching it. Little cuss broke down sobbing when the Keymaker was shot and killed but was understanding that it was done as a part of his purpose in helping Neo.
I’m rambling. It’s a hard call, I know. But from what I’ve gathered emailing and blogging with you over the past (nearly) couple of years, T.J., is that you and your wife don’t (and won’t) leave your own young ones hanging. If the overarching theme of 9 revolves around the good overcoming evil motif and that, yes, many dark things happen along the way, then maybe it’s better exposing kids to that at a formative age when we can coach them through the rough parts.
Just like reading, say, about some witch fattening up little lost kids in some forest so that she can bake them in the oven. And even in sanitized fairy tale retellings, kids the ages of our own children tend to “get” on that most primal/basal level.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

I found this link: http://www.parentpreviews.com/movie_reviews/nine/

They gave it a C+ based on violent content.

I worry about how graphic the corpses might be represented, but at the same time, my son loves th the zombie stuff in Halloween displays. *shrugging shoulders*

It states “characters have their eyes burned out.” Are we talking the stichpunk guys or actual humans? If humans, that may be a bit too much for my son. He has a thing about eyeballs.

I will let him see it one day, one way or another. I’m just really trying to determine if the theatre is the right place, or if I should wait till it comes out on DVD?

He’s really impatient to see it. If I hear from others I trust that it’s okay, we will see it sometime this week, otherwise, he’ll just have to wait.

12 09 2009
jongibbs

I haven’t seen it yet, but if it helps, I took my (then) 8-yr-old to see the first Harry Potter and he had nightmares about the troll scene.

After that, until he was about eleven or twelve, I made sure I saw a movie first before taking him to see it.

Of course, that didn’t save me from having my own nightmares πŸ˜‰

12 09 2009
jongibbs

I haven’t seen it yet, but if it helps, I took my (then) 8-yr-old to see the first Harry Potter and he had nightmares about the troll scene.

After that, until he was about eleven or twelve, I made sure I saw a movie first before taking him to see it.

Of course, that didn’t save me from having my own nightmares πŸ˜‰

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks! That’s good advice.

12 09 2009
jongibbs

I haven’t seen it yet, but if it helps, I took my (then) 8-yr-old to see the first Harry Potter and he had nightmares about the troll scene.

After that, until he was about eleven or twelve, I made sure I saw a movie first before taking him to see it.

Of course, that didn’t save me from having my own nightmares πŸ˜‰

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks! That’s good advice.

12 09 2009
jongibbs

I haven’t seen it yet, but if it helps, I took my (then) 8-yr-old to see the first Harry Potter and he had nightmares about the troll scene.
After that, until he was about eleven or twelve, I made sure I saw a movie first before taking him to see it.
Of course, that didn’t save me from having my own nightmares πŸ˜‰

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks! That’s good advice.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks! That’s good advice.

12 09 2009
jongibbs

I haven’t seen it yet, but if it helps, I took my (then) 8-yr-old to see the first Harry Potter and he had nightmares about the troll scene.
After that, until he was about eleven or twelve, I made sure I saw a movie first before taking him to see it.
Of course, that didn’t save me from having my own nightmares πŸ˜‰

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks! That’s good advice.

12 09 2009
dr_phil_physics

I thought at first you were asking about District 9… Eeek! No fair there are so many nine movies coming out in 2009: District 9, 9, Nine, and a fourth one whose name eludes me, but Googling “nine” ain’t gonna help. (grin)

The trailer for 9 looks impressive, but it’s only a 79 minute film. Local Grand Rapids MI reviewer gave it 3 stars and said it was thoughtful and well made.

That’s all I know.

Dr. Phil

12 09 2009
dr_phil_physics

I thought at first you were asking about District 9… Eeek! No fair there are so many nine movies coming out in 2009: District 9, 9, Nine, and a fourth one whose name eludes me, but Googling “nine” ain’t gonna help. (grin)

The trailer for 9 looks impressive, but it’s only a 79 minute film. Local Grand Rapids MI reviewer gave it 3 stars and said it was thoughtful and well made.

That’s all I know.

Dr. Phil

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

9 is a popular title this year.

No, not District 9. I’m pretty open to letting my kids see what they want — but not that open!

12 09 2009
dr_phil_physics

I thought at first you were asking about District 9… Eeek! No fair there are so many nine movies coming out in 2009: District 9, 9, Nine, and a fourth one whose name eludes me, but Googling “nine” ain’t gonna help. (grin)

The trailer for 9 looks impressive, but it’s only a 79 minute film. Local Grand Rapids MI reviewer gave it 3 stars and said it was thoughtful and well made.

That’s all I know.

Dr. Phil

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

9 is a popular title this year.

No, not District 9. I’m pretty open to letting my kids see what they want — but not that open!

12 09 2009
dr_phil_physics

I thought at first you were asking about District 9… Eeek! No fair there are so many nine movies coming out in 2009: District 9, 9, Nine, and a fourth one whose name eludes me, but Googling “nine” ain’t gonna help. (grin)
The trailer for 9 looks impressive, but it’s only a 79 minute film. Local Grand Rapids MI reviewer gave it 3 stars and said it was thoughtful and well made.
That’s all I know.
Dr. Phil

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

9 is a popular title this year.
No, not District 9. I’m pretty open to letting my kids see what they want — but not that open!

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

9 is a popular title this year.
No, not District 9. I’m pretty open to letting my kids see what they want — but not that open!

12 09 2009
dr_phil_physics

I thought at first you were asking about District 9… Eeek! No fair there are so many nine movies coming out in 2009: District 9, 9, Nine, and a fourth one whose name eludes me, but Googling “nine” ain’t gonna help. (grin)
The trailer for 9 looks impressive, but it’s only a 79 minute film. Local Grand Rapids MI reviewer gave it 3 stars and said it was thoughtful and well made.
That’s all I know.
Dr. Phil

12 09 2009
gaaneden

My husband and I just watched it. We gave it a B+. There were lots of kids in the audience – none of them cried or had to leave. That said, there’s some loud scary bits and some sad bits. You might want to have the “it’s not real” reminder talk with him before it. But it’s got a decent ending.

12 09 2009
gaaneden

My husband and I just watched it. We gave it a B+. There were lots of kids in the audience – none of them cried or had to leave. That said, there’s some loud scary bits and some sad bits. You might want to have the “it’s not real” reminder talk with him before it. But it’s got a decent ending.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Thank you so much! I really appreciate that.

He’s good with the “it’s not real” thing, but I will have that talk before hand, just in case.

12 09 2009
gaaneden

My husband and I just watched it. We gave it a B+. There were lots of kids in the audience – none of them cried or had to leave. That said, there’s some loud scary bits and some sad bits. You might want to have the “it’s not real” reminder talk with him before it. But it’s got a decent ending.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Thank you so much! I really appreciate that.

He’s good with the “it’s not real” thing, but I will have that talk before hand, just in case.

12 09 2009
gaaneden

My husband and I just watched it. We gave it a B+. There were lots of kids in the audience – none of them cried or had to leave. That said, there’s some loud scary bits and some sad bits. You might want to have the “it’s not real” reminder talk with him before it. But it’s got a decent ending.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Thank you so much! I really appreciate that.
He’s good with the “it’s not real” thing, but I will have that talk before hand, just in case.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Thank you so much! I really appreciate that.
He’s good with the “it’s not real” thing, but I will have that talk before hand, just in case.

12 09 2009
gaaneden

My husband and I just watched it. We gave it a B+. There were lots of kids in the audience – none of them cried or had to leave. That said, there’s some loud scary bits and some sad bits. You might want to have the “it’s not real” reminder talk with him before it. But it’s got a decent ending.

12 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

Hey, man. We just got back from seeing it.

The theater was packed. Lots of families and a good many little kids. Same as another poster down-thread–no crying. The eyeball thing? A non-issue. It’s the stitchpunk characters, and it’s their life essence being drained from their eyes and mouth.

Now, the imagery is dark. There are a few scenes involving human corpses, but nothing overt.

I’ll start with Thing 2 (daughter): Overall, the movie’s imagery didn’t faze her one way or the other.

Thing 1 (son): He was rapt with it all. Totally into it.

Both kids loved 7, the female warrior. The twins, 3 and 4, were cutesy but not over the top.

The ending is redemptive but not happy-go-lucky.

I’d say the scariest parts are the winged beast scene and the seamstress scene. The seamstress is a machine that has a flaring hood a la a cobra, and it hypnotizes the characters with a “borrowed” body of one of their brethren. Still, neither of my kids got shaken up at any point in the movie, and that really surprised me.

All in all, none of my initial concerns over the dark/violent images manifested.

Hope all that helps, T.J. Things like this are often a hard call, to be sure.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Sounds great! Thanks!

I hope to be able to take him some night this week after work as a reward if he gets “all happy faces” from the teacher for the day.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

Thank you so much! I really appreciate that.

He’s good with the “it’s not real” thing, but I will have that talk before hand, just in case.

12 09 2009
southernweirdo

9 is a popular title this year.

No, not District 9. I’m pretty open to letting my kids see what they want — but not that open!

13 09 2009
selfavowedgeek

You’re welcome.

It’s amazing how those smiley faces can motivate the kids, huh?

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