Writing Quotes for the Day:

29 08 2009

"There are three rules for writing the novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are." – W. Somerset Maugham

"You must stay drunk on writing so reality can not destroy you." – Ray Bradbury

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65 responses

29 08 2009
janradder

I love that W. Somerset Maugham quote.

29 08 2009
janradder

I love that W. Somerset Maugham quote.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

It’s funny because it’s true 🙂

29 08 2009
janradder

I love that W. Somerset Maugham quote.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

It’s funny because it’s true 🙂

29 08 2009
janradder

I love that W. Somerset Maugham quote.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

It’s funny because it’s true 🙂

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

It’s funny because it’s true 🙂

29 08 2009
janradder

I love that W. Somerset Maugham quote.

30 08 2009
bearleyport

Bradbury’s is a bland summary of a terrific prose poem by Baudelaire.

30 08 2009
bearleyport

Bradbury’s is a bland summary of a terrific prose poem by Baudelaire.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

Which poem? I’d like to look it up.

31 08 2009
bearleyport

It’s called Enivrez-vous. (“Get drunk.”) It’s from his book PARIS SPLEEN. You can find my translation at the end of this post

http://bearleyport.livejournal.com/90030.html?mode=reply

or get the scholarly lap-dog version online and in print. It’s a famous poem, wouldn’t be surprised if Bradbury had read and “plagiarized” it — not unlike the narrator of Hrabal’s TOO LOUD A SOLITUDE, who had read so many books he didn’t know where the books ended and his own thoughts began.

Jim Thompson trumped Maugham, I think: “There are 32 ways to write a story, and I have used every one, but there is only one plot – things are not what they seem.”

I came up with 52 ways, but that’s in combination. Handy if you want to randomize your story arc by drawing cards. It works at any scale: novel, chapter/short story, scene, etc. Dick said the novel was about the criminal, a short story about the crime, and I wonder if the criminal can’t be revealed through a series of crimes.

Take Bradbury’s crime of “plagiarism’. Where does creativity come from? We borrow from here and there, try to mix it up in a new and interesting way. He has done that very well.

31 08 2009
southernweirdo

“The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.” – Ephesians 1:9 KJV

Beneath every story lies the same old bones. I guess the only difference in the end is how we dress them.

Thanks for the translation. I’m heading over to read it now.

30 08 2009
bearleyport

Bradbury’s is a bland summary of a terrific prose poem by Baudelaire.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

Which poem? I’d like to look it up.

31 08 2009
bearleyport

It’s called Enivrez-vous. (“Get drunk.”) It’s from his book PARIS SPLEEN. You can find my translation at the end of this post

http://bearleyport.livejournal.com/90030.html?mode=reply

or get the scholarly lap-dog version online and in print. It’s a famous poem, wouldn’t be surprised if Bradbury had read and “plagiarized” it — not unlike the narrator of Hrabal’s TOO LOUD A SOLITUDE, who had read so many books he didn’t know where the books ended and his own thoughts began.

Jim Thompson trumped Maugham, I think: “There are 32 ways to write a story, and I have used every one, but there is only one plot – things are not what they seem.”

I came up with 52 ways, but that’s in combination. Handy if you want to randomize your story arc by drawing cards. It works at any scale: novel, chapter/short story, scene, etc. Dick said the novel was about the criminal, a short story about the crime, and I wonder if the criminal can’t be revealed through a series of crimes.

Take Bradbury’s crime of “plagiarism’. Where does creativity come from? We borrow from here and there, try to mix it up in a new and interesting way. He has done that very well.

31 08 2009
southernweirdo

“The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.” – Ephesians 1:9 KJV

Beneath every story lies the same old bones. I guess the only difference in the end is how we dress them.

Thanks for the translation. I’m heading over to read it now.

30 08 2009
bearleyport

Bradbury’s is a bland summary of a terrific prose poem by Baudelaire.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

Which poem? I’d like to look it up.

31 08 2009
bearleyport

It’s called Enivrez-vous. (“Get drunk.”) It’s from his book PARIS SPLEEN. You can find my translation at the end of this post
http://bearleyport.livejournal.com/90030.html?mode=reply
or get the scholarly lap-dog version online and in print. It’s a famous poem, wouldn’t be surprised if Bradbury had read and “plagiarized” it — not unlike the narrator of Hrabal’s TOO LOUD A SOLITUDE, who had read so many books he didn’t know where the books ended and his own thoughts began.
Jim Thompson trumped Maugham, I think: “There are 32 ways to write a story, and I have used every one, but there is only one plot – things are not what they seem.”
I came up with 52 ways, but that’s in combination. Handy if you want to randomize your story arc by drawing cards. It works at any scale: novel, chapter/short story, scene, etc. Dick said the novel was about the criminal, a short story about the crime, and I wonder if the criminal can’t be revealed through a series of crimes.
Take Bradbury’s crime of “plagiarism’. Where does creativity come from? We borrow from here and there, try to mix it up in a new and interesting way. He has done that very well.

31 08 2009
southernweirdo

“The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.” – Ephesians 1:9 KJV
Beneath every story lies the same old bones. I guess the only difference in the end is how we dress them.
Thanks for the translation. I’m heading over to read it now.

31 08 2009
southernweirdo

“The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.” – Ephesians 1:9 KJV
Beneath every story lies the same old bones. I guess the only difference in the end is how we dress them.
Thanks for the translation. I’m heading over to read it now.

31 08 2009
bearleyport

It’s called Enivrez-vous. (“Get drunk.”) It’s from his book PARIS SPLEEN. You can find my translation at the end of this post
http://bearleyport.livejournal.com/90030.html?mode=reply
or get the scholarly lap-dog version online and in print. It’s a famous poem, wouldn’t be surprised if Bradbury had read and “plagiarized” it — not unlike the narrator of Hrabal’s TOO LOUD A SOLITUDE, who had read so many books he didn’t know where the books ended and his own thoughts began.
Jim Thompson trumped Maugham, I think: “There are 32 ways to write a story, and I have used every one, but there is only one plot – things are not what they seem.”
I came up with 52 ways, but that’s in combination. Handy if you want to randomize your story arc by drawing cards. It works at any scale: novel, chapter/short story, scene, etc. Dick said the novel was about the criminal, a short story about the crime, and I wonder if the criminal can’t be revealed through a series of crimes.
Take Bradbury’s crime of “plagiarism’. Where does creativity come from? We borrow from here and there, try to mix it up in a new and interesting way. He has done that very well.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

Which poem? I’d like to look it up.

30 08 2009
bearleyport

Bradbury’s is a bland summary of a terrific prose poem by Baudelaire.

30 08 2009
namfle

That first quote draw an actual guffaw out of me.

-elf-

30 08 2009
namfle

That first quote draw an actual guffaw out of me.

-elf-

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

🙂 Good. It was supposed to.

30 08 2009
namfle

That first quote draw an actual guffaw out of me.

-elf-

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

🙂 Good. It was supposed to.

30 08 2009
namfle

That first quote draw an actual guffaw out of me.
-elf-

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

🙂 Good. It was supposed to.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

🙂 Good. It was supposed to.

30 08 2009
namfle

That first quote draw an actual guffaw out of me.
-elf-

30 08 2009
jongibbs

Lol 🙂

30 08 2009
jongibbs

Lol 🙂

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

🙂

30 08 2009
jongibbs

Lol 🙂

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

🙂

30 08 2009
jongibbs

Lol 🙂

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

🙂

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

🙂

30 08 2009
jongibbs

Lol 🙂

30 08 2009
camillealexa

I love the Bradbury quote. What year is that from?

30 08 2009
camillealexa

I love the Bradbury quote. What year is that from?

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

I could be wrong, but I think it’s from “Zen in the Art of Writing” (1990).

30 08 2009
camillealexa

I was trying to place it along the timeline of his career arc.

30 08 2009
camillealexa

I love the Bradbury quote. What year is that from?

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

I could be wrong, but I think it’s from “Zen in the Art of Writing” (1990).

30 08 2009
camillealexa

I was trying to place it along the timeline of his career arc.

30 08 2009
camillealexa

I love the Bradbury quote. What year is that from?

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

I could be wrong, but I think it’s from “Zen in the Art of Writing” (1990).

30 08 2009
camillealexa

I was trying to place it along the timeline of his career arc.

30 08 2009
camillealexa

I was trying to place it along the timeline of his career arc.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

I could be wrong, but I think it’s from “Zen in the Art of Writing” (1990).

30 08 2009
camillealexa

I love the Bradbury quote. What year is that from?

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

I could be wrong, but I think it’s from “Zen in the Art of Writing” (1990).

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

It’s funny because it’s true 🙂

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

Which poem? I’d like to look it up.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

🙂 Good. It was supposed to.

30 08 2009
southernweirdo

🙂

30 08 2009
camillealexa

I was trying to place it along the timeline of his career arc.

31 08 2009
bearleyport

It’s called Enivrez-vous. (“Get drunk.”) It’s from his book PARIS SPLEEN. You can find my translation at the end of this post

http://bearleyport.livejournal.com/90030.html?mode=reply

or get the scholarly lap-dog version online and in print. It’s a famous poem, wouldn’t be surprised if Bradbury had read and “plagiarized” it — not unlike the narrator of Hrabal’s TOO LOUD A SOLITUDE, who had read so many books he didn’t know where the books ended and his own thoughts began.

Jim Thompson trumped Maugham, I think: “There are 32 ways to write a story, and I have used every one, but there is only one plot – things are not what they seem.”

I came up with 52 ways, but that’s in combination. Handy if you want to randomize your story arc by drawing cards. It works at any scale: novel, chapter/short story, scene, etc. Dick said the novel was about the criminal, a short story about the crime, and I wonder if the criminal can’t be revealed through a series of crimes.

Take Bradbury’s crime of “plagiarism’. Where does creativity come from? We borrow from here and there, try to mix it up in a new and interesting way. He has done that very well.

31 08 2009
southernweirdo

“The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.” – Ephesians 1:9 KJV

Beneath every story lies the same old bones. I guess the only difference in the end is how we dress them.

Thanks for the translation. I’m heading over to read it now.

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