Author Spotlight: Stephanie Burgis

28 08 2009

Stephanie Burgis was nice enough to let me interview her for Fantasy Magazine: http://www.darkfantasy.org/fantasy/?p=4896

Be sure to read her story, "Offerings," while you are there.

Also, on a completely unrelated note, my A/C is fixed. Yay! Cool air is teh awesome!

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70 responses

28 08 2009
alaneer

Great interview!

I’m glad your A/C is fixed.

28 08 2009
alaneer

Great interview!

I’m glad your A/C is fixed.

28 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks on both counts.

28 08 2009
alaneer

Great interview!

I’m glad your A/C is fixed.

28 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks on both counts.

28 08 2009
alaneer

Great interview!
I’m glad your A/C is fixed.

28 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks on both counts.

28 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks on both counts.

28 08 2009
alaneer

Great interview!
I’m glad your A/C is fixed.

28 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks on both counts.

28 08 2009
marshallpayne1

Glad your A/C is working.

Great interview, T.J.

28 08 2009
marshallpayne1

Glad your A/C is working.

Great interview, T.J.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks!

28 08 2009
marshallpayne1

Glad your A/C is working.

Great interview, T.J.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks!

28 08 2009
marshallpayne1

Glad your A/C is working.
Great interview, T.J.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks!

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks!

28 08 2009
marshallpayne1

Glad your A/C is working.
Great interview, T.J.

28 08 2009
kmarkhoover

nice!

You did a good job with the interview. I haven’t read her story yet, but I’ll get to it this weekend.

28 08 2009
kmarkhoover

nice!

You did a good job with the interview. I haven’t read her story yet, but I’ll get to it this weekend.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Re: nice!

You should. It’s a fun story.

28 08 2009
kmarkhoover

nice!

You did a good job with the interview. I haven’t read her story yet, but I’ll get to it this weekend.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Re: nice!

You should. It’s a fun story.

28 08 2009
kmarkhoover

nice!
You did a good job with the interview. I haven’t read her story yet, but I’ll get to it this weekend.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Re: nice!
You should. It’s a fun story.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Re: nice!
You should. It’s a fun story.

28 08 2009
kmarkhoover

nice!
You did a good job with the interview. I haven’t read her story yet, but I’ll get to it this weekend.

28 08 2009
bearleyport

I’d say the interview questions were leading. Pack too much information into the question, you’ll get the answer you expected, which can be disappointing.

28 08 2009
bearleyport

I’d say the interview questions were leading. Pack too much information into the question, you’ll get the answer you expected, which can be disappointing.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for that.

I always appreciate honest feedback (for real), and will keep this in mind going forward.

29 08 2009
bearleyport

I’ll tell you, it was hard thing for me to learn — and something I’ve got to keep reminding myself of.

I think it’s great you got into Fantasy Migraine. Something to put my feedback into perspective. I probably told you about my “disastrous” interview with Greg Bear, where I asked a leading question — having done my homework — and he gave me the “wrong” answer.

Anymore, I try to ask open-ended questions. Questions that I genuinely want to know the answers to. But I try to keep my opinions or “spin” out of the question. That’s hard, but I think it’s essential to journalism, even “gonzo” journalism. You’ve got to leave yourself and the reader open to what the other person has to say, have got to be — in other words — a good listener. Give a person a chance, he or she will surprise you — and that surprise is the springboard for creativity. The unlikely connection. Lucky me, I just picked up the Surrealist Manifestos in the original French, and I can read them.

Would be happy to talk with you about these problems in greater depth. Let me know. I’m convinced that interviewing is of great importance in nonfiction and fiction.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

I’m really enjoying the whole interview process. It’s not completely new to me, I did study it as part of my degree back in school, but haven’t put some of these principles into practice in years.

I think you’ll get a kick out of my next interview coming out in a few weeks. The questions really got the author to open up.

The hardest thing about interviews is you have to remember that the interview is all about the other person and not about yourself. That’s the part I think we all struggle with as writers. There is a tendency to want to inject yourself in there, but this can be a disservice to the person you are trying to profile.

“(T)ry to ask open-ended questions. Questions that (you) genuinely want to know the answers to.” Boom! I think that’s the key right there.

29 08 2009
bearleyport

I think the interview has more to teach us about the art of fiction than poetry. How to get out of the way as writers and show the characters — what they’re made of — to the readers.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Huh. Interesting way to look at it. Thanks!

BTW – I read your interview with Greg Bear — Good stuff.

28 08 2009
bearleyport

I’d say the interview questions were leading. Pack too much information into the question, you’ll get the answer you expected, which can be disappointing.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for that.

I always appreciate honest feedback (for real), and will keep this in mind going forward.

29 08 2009
bearleyport

I’ll tell you, it was hard thing for me to learn — and something I’ve got to keep reminding myself of.

I think it’s great you got into Fantasy Migraine. Something to put my feedback into perspective. I probably told you about my “disastrous” interview with Greg Bear, where I asked a leading question — having done my homework — and he gave me the “wrong” answer.

Anymore, I try to ask open-ended questions. Questions that I genuinely want to know the answers to. But I try to keep my opinions or “spin” out of the question. That’s hard, but I think it’s essential to journalism, even “gonzo” journalism. You’ve got to leave yourself and the reader open to what the other person has to say, have got to be — in other words — a good listener. Give a person a chance, he or she will surprise you — and that surprise is the springboard for creativity. The unlikely connection. Lucky me, I just picked up the Surrealist Manifestos in the original French, and I can read them.

Would be happy to talk with you about these problems in greater depth. Let me know. I’m convinced that interviewing is of great importance in nonfiction and fiction.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

I’m really enjoying the whole interview process. It’s not completely new to me, I did study it as part of my degree back in school, but haven’t put some of these principles into practice in years.

I think you’ll get a kick out of my next interview coming out in a few weeks. The questions really got the author to open up.

The hardest thing about interviews is you have to remember that the interview is all about the other person and not about yourself. That’s the part I think we all struggle with as writers. There is a tendency to want to inject yourself in there, but this can be a disservice to the person you are trying to profile.

“(T)ry to ask open-ended questions. Questions that (you) genuinely want to know the answers to.” Boom! I think that’s the key right there.

29 08 2009
bearleyport

I think the interview has more to teach us about the art of fiction than poetry. How to get out of the way as writers and show the characters — what they’re made of — to the readers.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Huh. Interesting way to look at it. Thanks!

BTW – I read your interview with Greg Bear — Good stuff.

28 08 2009
bearleyport

I’d say the interview questions were leading. Pack too much information into the question, you’ll get the answer you expected, which can be disappointing.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for that.
I always appreciate honest feedback (for real), and will keep this in mind going forward.

29 08 2009
bearleyport

I’ll tell you, it was hard thing for me to learn — and something I’ve got to keep reminding myself of.
I think it’s great you got into Fantasy Migraine. Something to put my feedback into perspective. I probably told you about my “disastrous” interview with Greg Bear, where I asked a leading question — having done my homework — and he gave me the “wrong” answer.
Anymore, I try to ask open-ended questions. Questions that I genuinely want to know the answers to. But I try to keep my opinions or “spin” out of the question. That’s hard, but I think it’s essential to journalism, even “gonzo” journalism. You’ve got to leave yourself and the reader open to what the other person has to say, have got to be — in other words — a good listener. Give a person a chance, he or she will surprise you — and that surprise is the springboard for creativity. The unlikely connection. Lucky me, I just picked up the Surrealist Manifestos in the original French, and I can read them.
Would be happy to talk with you about these problems in greater depth. Let me know. I’m convinced that interviewing is of great importance in nonfiction and fiction.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

I’m really enjoying the whole interview process. It’s not completely new to me, I did study it as part of my degree back in school, but haven’t put some of these principles into practice in years.
I think you’ll get a kick out of my next interview coming out in a few weeks. The questions really got the author to open up.
The hardest thing about interviews is you have to remember that the interview is all about the other person and not about yourself. That’s the part I think we all struggle with as writers. There is a tendency to want to inject yourself in there, but this can be a disservice to the person you are trying to profile.
“(T)ry to ask open-ended questions. Questions that (you) genuinely want to know the answers to.” Boom! I think that’s the key right there.

29 08 2009
bearleyport

I think the interview has more to teach us about the art of fiction than poetry. How to get out of the way as writers and show the characters — what they’re made of — to the readers.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Huh. Interesting way to look at it. Thanks!
BTW – I read your interview with Greg Bear — Good stuff.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Huh. Interesting way to look at it. Thanks!
BTW – I read your interview with Greg Bear — Good stuff.

29 08 2009
bearleyport

I think the interview has more to teach us about the art of fiction than poetry. How to get out of the way as writers and show the characters — what they’re made of — to the readers.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

I’m really enjoying the whole interview process. It’s not completely new to me, I did study it as part of my degree back in school, but haven’t put some of these principles into practice in years.
I think you’ll get a kick out of my next interview coming out in a few weeks. The questions really got the author to open up.
The hardest thing about interviews is you have to remember that the interview is all about the other person and not about yourself. That’s the part I think we all struggle with as writers. There is a tendency to want to inject yourself in there, but this can be a disservice to the person you are trying to profile.
“(T)ry to ask open-ended questions. Questions that (you) genuinely want to know the answers to.” Boom! I think that’s the key right there.

29 08 2009
bearleyport

I’ll tell you, it was hard thing for me to learn — and something I’ve got to keep reminding myself of.
I think it’s great you got into Fantasy Migraine. Something to put my feedback into perspective. I probably told you about my “disastrous” interview with Greg Bear, where I asked a leading question — having done my homework — and he gave me the “wrong” answer.
Anymore, I try to ask open-ended questions. Questions that I genuinely want to know the answers to. But I try to keep my opinions or “spin” out of the question. That’s hard, but I think it’s essential to journalism, even “gonzo” journalism. You’ve got to leave yourself and the reader open to what the other person has to say, have got to be — in other words — a good listener. Give a person a chance, he or she will surprise you — and that surprise is the springboard for creativity. The unlikely connection. Lucky me, I just picked up the Surrealist Manifestos in the original French, and I can read them.
Would be happy to talk with you about these problems in greater depth. Let me know. I’m convinced that interviewing is of great importance in nonfiction and fiction.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for that.
I always appreciate honest feedback (for real), and will keep this in mind going forward.

28 08 2009
bearleyport

I’d say the interview questions were leading. Pack too much information into the question, you’ll get the answer you expected, which can be disappointing.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks for that.

I always appreciate honest feedback (for real), and will keep this in mind going forward.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Re: nice!

You should. It’s a fun story.

29 08 2009
bearleyport

I’ll tell you, it was hard thing for me to learn — and something I’ve got to keep reminding myself of.

I think it’s great you got into Fantasy Migraine. Something to put my feedback into perspective. I probably told you about my “disastrous” interview with Greg Bear, where I asked a leading question — having done my homework — and he gave me the “wrong” answer.

Anymore, I try to ask open-ended questions. Questions that I genuinely want to know the answers to. But I try to keep my opinions or “spin” out of the question. That’s hard, but I think it’s essential to journalism, even “gonzo” journalism. You’ve got to leave yourself and the reader open to what the other person has to say, have got to be — in other words — a good listener. Give a person a chance, he or she will surprise you — and that surprise is the springboard for creativity. The unlikely connection. Lucky me, I just picked up the Surrealist Manifestos in the original French, and I can read them.

Would be happy to talk with you about these problems in greater depth. Let me know. I’m convinced that interviewing is of great importance in nonfiction and fiction.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks!

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

I’m really enjoying the whole interview process. It’s not completely new to me, I did study it as part of my degree back in school, but haven’t put some of these principles into practice in years.

I think you’ll get a kick out of my next interview coming out in a few weeks. The questions really got the author to open up.

The hardest thing about interviews is you have to remember that the interview is all about the other person and not about yourself. That’s the part I think we all struggle with as writers. There is a tendency to want to inject yourself in there, but this can be a disservice to the person you are trying to profile.

“(T)ry to ask open-ended questions. Questions that (you) genuinely want to know the answers to.” Boom! I think that’s the key right there.

29 08 2009
bearleyport

I think the interview has more to teach us about the art of fiction than poetry. How to get out of the way as writers and show the characters — what they’re made of — to the readers.

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Huh. Interesting way to look at it. Thanks!

BTW – I read your interview with Greg Bear — Good stuff.

29 08 2009
jongibbs

Congrats on the interview, and Yay! on the fixed A/C thing πŸ™‚

29 08 2009
jongibbs

Congrats on the interview, and Yay! on the fixed A/C thing πŸ™‚

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks Jon!

29 08 2009
jongibbs

Congrats on the interview, and Yay! on the fixed A/C thing πŸ™‚

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks Jon!

29 08 2009
jongibbs

Congrats on the interview, and Yay! on the fixed A/C thing πŸ™‚

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks Jon!

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks Jon!

29 08 2009
jongibbs

Congrats on the interview, and Yay! on the fixed A/C thing πŸ™‚

29 08 2009
southernweirdo

Thanks Jon!

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