Thoughts on first lines…

3 02 2009

*WARNING* Rambling, unorganized writing post lies ahead…

I’ve had this line in my head all day:

"If I had a gun for every ace I had drawn/I could arm a town the size of Abilene."
-The Grateful Dead, from "Loser"

Why has it been on my mind? Because it is a great opening. It introduces/defines the character, gives a sense of the setting, and creates the tone carried throughout the rest of the song. It is the hook,and it captures your attention.

Anyone who knows me and has seen my personal writing process would tell you that it is … uhm … not much of a process at all, really. It’s kind of a mess, to be honest. I am not a writer who painstakingly plots each scene, each turning point, each character, resolutions, conflicts, etc. I rarely use formal outlines or technical brainstorming activities. I usually just have a basic idea, write a story from that idea (usually jotting notes about where I might go next or notes on world-building, if required), and then edit the work into something resembling cohesive once I have a first draft. I guess you could say that my first draft is my outline. When creating a story or poem, I just let ideas flow, and then clean up the mess later.

My favorite stories for some reason, those I write that hold the fondest spot in my heart (whether they sell or not), usually begin with nothing more than a first line. Same for when I used to write songs back in high school and college for the various bands I used to play with (although in the case of music, an initial riff might take the place of words). It’s the same with my poetry. The first line sucks me into the story-telling process and makes the process fun for me. I have to have a first line(or couple of lines) I can get excited about.

Remember, that first line is your hook. If it doesn’t hook you, the creator of the work, what makes you think it might work for an editor or potential reader? That’s the way I see it, anyway.

Some thoughts on first lines from a few recent stories of mine currently available online:

  • From “The Last Wet Place”: “The lake rose from the bowels of the earth to meet the day.”
  • From “The Day My Hands Fell Off”: Because they were unused, because they had remained idle beyond the allotted time, because my chubby fingers had long since grown useless, my hands fell off.”
  • From “ReBirth”: “I awoke and the world had changed. It had moved on without me.”

I jotted down these three lines when they came to me. I did not write the stories at the time the lines came to me. In fact, I read the lines several times a day sometimes, wondering where the lines were trying to take me. I did not know if they would end up poetry, a song, a short story, or even a novel. I just knew that these lines drew me in (Into what? I wasn’t always sure at the time). I obsessed over them, running them through my head for a week or so each until I wrote them down and added more sentences, more thoughts, more action, and, I hope, more meaning.

So basically, what I’m trying to say in my rambling way is that every story begins with a single thought.

If you have time, please drop a line about what openings in literature/song/film struck a chord with you?

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90 responses

4 02 2009
dr_phil_physics

I was a young person when Michael Crichton’s Andromeda Strain came out. Opening line: “A man with binoculars.”

Ooh — it starts with an incomplete sentence AND sucks you in.

Dr. Phil

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

It makes me wanna finish that sentence. I’ll give it that much πŸ™‚

I, too, devoured Crichton when I was growing up. I always found it interesting that some of his best books (Eaters of the Dead, Sphere, Congo) turned out to be the worst movies.

4 02 2009
dr_phil_physics

I was a young person when Michael Crichton’s Andromeda Strain came out. Opening line: “A man with binoculars.”

Ooh — it starts with an incomplete sentence AND sucks you in.

Dr. Phil

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

It makes me wanna finish that sentence. I’ll give it that much πŸ™‚

I, too, devoured Crichton when I was growing up. I always found it interesting that some of his best books (Eaters of the Dead, Sphere, Congo) turned out to be the worst movies.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

It makes me wanna finish that sentence. I’ll give it that much πŸ™‚

I, too, devoured Crichton when I was growing up. I always found it interesting that some of his best books (Eaters of the Dead, Sphere, Congo) turned out to be the worst movies.

4 02 2009
dr_phil_physics

I was a young person when Michael Crichton’s Andromeda Strain came out. Opening line: “A man with binoculars.”

Ooh — it starts with an incomplete sentence AND sucks you in.

Dr. Phil

4 02 2009
dr_phil_physics

I was a young person when Michael Crichton’s Andromeda Strain came out. Opening line: “A man with binoculars.”

Ooh — it starts with an incomplete sentence AND sucks you in.

Dr. Phil

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

It makes me wanna finish that sentence. I’ll give it that much πŸ™‚

I, too, devoured Crichton when I was growing up. I always found it interesting that some of his best books (Eaters of the Dead, Sphere, Congo) turned out to be the worst movies.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

It makes me wanna finish that sentence. I’ll give it that much πŸ™‚

I, too, devoured Crichton when I was growing up. I always found it interesting that some of his best books (Eaters of the Dead, Sphere, Congo) turned out to be the worst movies.

4 02 2009
dr_phil_physics

I was a young person when Michael Crichton’s Andromeda Strain came out. Opening line: “A man with binoculars.”

Ooh — it starts with an incomplete sentence AND sucks you in.

Dr. Phil

4 02 2009
dr_phil_physics

I was a young person when Michael Crichton’s Andromeda Strain came out. Opening line: “A man with binoculars.”

Ooh — it starts with an incomplete sentence AND sucks you in.

Dr. Phil

4 02 2009
dr_phil_physics

I was a young person when Michael Crichton’s Andromeda Strain came out. Opening line: “A man with binoculars.”

Ooh — it starts with an incomplete sentence AND sucks you in.

Dr. Phil

4 02 2009
dr_phil_physics

I was a young person when Michael Crichton’s Andromeda Strain came out. Opening line: “A man with binoculars.”

Ooh — it starts with an incomplete sentence AND sucks you in.

Dr. Phil

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

It makes me wanna finish that sentence. I’ll give it that much πŸ™‚

I, too, devoured Crichton when I was growing up. I always found it interesting that some of his best books (Eaters of the Dead, Sphere, Congo) turned out to be the worst movies.

4 02 2009
dr_phil_physics

I was a young person when Michael Crichton’s Andromeda Strain came out. Opening line: “A man with binoculars.”

Ooh — it starts with an incomplete sentence AND sucks you in.

Dr. Phil

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

It makes me wanna finish that sentence. I’ll give it that much πŸ™‚

I, too, devoured Crichton when I was growing up. I always found it interesting that some of his best books (Eaters of the Dead, Sphere, Congo) turned out to be the worst movies.

4 02 2009
dr_phil_physics

I was a young person when Michael Crichton’s Andromeda Strain came out. Opening line: “A man with binoculars.”
Ooh — it starts with an incomplete sentence AND sucks you in.
Dr. Phil

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

It makes me wanna finish that sentence. I’ll give it that much πŸ™‚
I, too, devoured Crichton when I was growing up. I always found it interesting that some of his best books (Eaters of the Dead, Sphere, Congo) turned out to be the worst movies.

4 02 2009
bearleyport

How about “working class hero” by John Lennon:

As soon as you’re born they make you feel small By giving you no time instead of it all
Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all

I got a kick out of the DC GUIDE TO COMIC BOOK WRITING which broke hooks down into basic forms, and a quote from Chekov — as if the introduction showed direction and velocity that would define the story arc/parabola.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

Great song!

I’ll have to check out that particular DC Guide.

4 02 2009
bearleyport

How about “working class hero” by John Lennon:

As soon as you’re born they make you feel small By giving you no time instead of it all
Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all

I got a kick out of the DC GUIDE TO COMIC BOOK WRITING which broke hooks down into basic forms, and a quote from Chekov — as if the introduction showed direction and velocity that would define the story arc/parabola.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

Great song!

I’ll have to check out that particular DC Guide.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

Great song!

I’ll have to check out that particular DC Guide.

4 02 2009
bearleyport

How about “working class hero” by John Lennon:

As soon as you’re born they make you feel small By giving you no time instead of it all
Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all

I got a kick out of the DC GUIDE TO COMIC BOOK WRITING which broke hooks down into basic forms, and a quote from Chekov — as if the introduction showed direction and velocity that would define the story arc/parabola.

4 02 2009
bearleyport

How about “working class hero” by John Lennon:

As soon as you’re born they make you feel small By giving you no time instead of it all
Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all

I got a kick out of the DC GUIDE TO COMIC BOOK WRITING which broke hooks down into basic forms, and a quote from Chekov — as if the introduction showed direction and velocity that would define the story arc/parabola.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

Great song!

I’ll have to check out that particular DC Guide.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

Great song!

I’ll have to check out that particular DC Guide.

4 02 2009
bearleyport

How about “working class hero” by John Lennon:

As soon as you’re born they make you feel small By giving you no time instead of it all
Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all

I got a kick out of the DC GUIDE TO COMIC BOOK WRITING which broke hooks down into basic forms, and a quote from Chekov — as if the introduction showed direction and velocity that would define the story arc/parabola.

4 02 2009
bearleyport

How about “working class hero” by John Lennon:

As soon as you’re born they make you feel small By giving you no time instead of it all
Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all

I got a kick out of the DC GUIDE TO COMIC BOOK WRITING which broke hooks down into basic forms, and a quote from Chekov — as if the introduction showed direction and velocity that would define the story arc/parabola.

4 02 2009
bearleyport

How about “working class hero” by John Lennon:

As soon as you’re born they make you feel small By giving you no time instead of it all
Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all

I got a kick out of the DC GUIDE TO COMIC BOOK WRITING which broke hooks down into basic forms, and a quote from Chekov — as if the introduction showed direction and velocity that would define the story arc/parabola.

4 02 2009
bearleyport

How about “working class hero” by John Lennon:

As soon as you’re born they make you feel small By giving you no time instead of it all
Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all

I got a kick out of the DC GUIDE TO COMIC BOOK WRITING which broke hooks down into basic forms, and a quote from Chekov — as if the introduction showed direction and velocity that would define the story arc/parabola.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

Great song!

I’ll have to check out that particular DC Guide.

4 02 2009
bearleyport

How about “working class hero” by John Lennon:

As soon as you’re born they make you feel small By giving you no time instead of it all
Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all

I got a kick out of the DC GUIDE TO COMIC BOOK WRITING which broke hooks down into basic forms, and a quote from Chekov — as if the introduction showed direction and velocity that would define the story arc/parabola.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

Great song!

I’ll have to check out that particular DC Guide.

4 02 2009
bearleyport

How about “working class hero” by John Lennon:
As soon as you’re born they make you feel small By giving you no time instead of it all
Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all

I got a kick out of the DC GUIDE TO COMIC BOOK WRITING which broke hooks down into basic forms, and a quote from Chekov — as if the introduction showed direction and velocity that would define the story arc/parabola.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

Great song!
I’ll have to check out that particular DC Guide.

4 02 2009
j_cheney

So I see that, and immediatly am distracted by the question….Abilene, Texas, or Abilene, Kansas? ::tearing at hair::

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

I’m thinking Texas…but now I’m not sure…

4 02 2009
j_cheney

So I see that, and immediatly am distracted by the question….Abilene, Texas, or Abilene, Kansas? ::tearing at hair::

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

I’m thinking Texas…but now I’m not sure…

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

I’m thinking Texas…but now I’m not sure…

4 02 2009
j_cheney

So I see that, and immediatly am distracted by the question….Abilene, Texas, or Abilene, Kansas? ::tearing at hair::

4 02 2009
j_cheney

So I see that, and immediatly am distracted by the question….Abilene, Texas, or Abilene, Kansas? ::tearing at hair::

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

I’m thinking Texas…but now I’m not sure…

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

I’m thinking Texas…but now I’m not sure…

4 02 2009
j_cheney

So I see that, and immediatly am distracted by the question….Abilene, Texas, or Abilene, Kansas? ::tearing at hair::

4 02 2009
j_cheney

So I see that, and immediatly am distracted by the question….Abilene, Texas, or Abilene, Kansas? ::tearing at hair::

4 02 2009
j_cheney

So I see that, and immediatly am distracted by the question….Abilene, Texas, or Abilene, Kansas? ::tearing at hair::

4 02 2009
j_cheney

So I see that, and immediatly am distracted by the question….Abilene, Texas, or Abilene, Kansas? ::tearing at hair::

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

I’m thinking Texas…but now I’m not sure…

4 02 2009
j_cheney

So I see that, and immediatly am distracted by the question….Abilene, Texas, or Abilene, Kansas? ::tearing at hair::

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

I’m thinking Texas…but now I’m not sure…

4 02 2009
j_cheney

So I see that, and immediatly am distracted by the question….Abilene, Texas, or Abilene, Kansas? ::tearing at hair::

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

I’m thinking Texas…but now I’m not sure…

4 02 2009
cafenowhere

Lately my poems germinate from old memories I want to rehabilitate, each with a specific feeling and image. I have to work up to that image, so the first thought rarely manifests in the first line.

But the last poem I wrote that evolved from a line I kept repeating to myself, mulling over, was “Begging Auspices,” which begins with the imperative “Read the signs…”

Two songs I loved from the first line–“Oceans” by Rob Dickinson: “As far as I can see, you and I are valentines for all we know”–and “Shaken Baby” by Pernice Brothers: “Please don’t go, won’t you stay until I’m sleeping?”

I don’t know if they’re great first lines, but they grabbed me.

Interestingly enough, I can usually tell by the shape of a poem on a page if I will dislike it. Don’t even need to read the first line.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

“by the shape” huh?

Interesting. I’ve been playing with “shape” poems for precisely that reason lately. “Tripods” and “Gravestones” (appearing sometime soon on Every Day Poets) are both shape poems.

9 02 2009
cafenowhere

I wasn’t thinking of concrete poetry, which I actually admire when it takes on an unusual subject. I was thinking of poetry that makes me feel the poet tried to infuse meaning by tinkering with line and space instead of waiting until they had something worthwhile to say. So many times, the more persnickety the formatting in a literary poem (not SF for some reason), the less value I take from it.

4 02 2009
cafenowhere

Lately my poems germinate from old memories I want to rehabilitate, each with a specific feeling and image. I have to work up to that image, so the first thought rarely manifests in the first line.

But the last poem I wrote that evolved from a line I kept repeating to myself, mulling over, was “Begging Auspices,” which begins with the imperative “Read the signs…”

Two songs I loved from the first line–“Oceans” by Rob Dickinson: “As far as I can see, you and I are valentines for all we know”–and “Shaken Baby” by Pernice Brothers: “Please don’t go, won’t you stay until I’m sleeping?”

I don’t know if they’re great first lines, but they grabbed me.

Interestingly enough, I can usually tell by the shape of a poem on a page if I will dislike it. Don’t even need to read the first line.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

“by the shape” huh?

Interesting. I’ve been playing with “shape” poems for precisely that reason lately. “Tripods” and “Gravestones” (appearing sometime soon on Every Day Poets) are both shape poems.

9 02 2009
cafenowhere

I wasn’t thinking of concrete poetry, which I actually admire when it takes on an unusual subject. I was thinking of poetry that makes me feel the poet tried to infuse meaning by tinkering with line and space instead of waiting until they had something worthwhile to say. So many times, the more persnickety the formatting in a literary poem (not SF for some reason), the less value I take from it.

9 02 2009
cafenowhere

I wasn’t thinking of concrete poetry, which I actually admire when it takes on an unusual subject. I was thinking of poetry that makes me feel the poet tried to infuse meaning by tinkering with line and space instead of waiting until they had something worthwhile to say. So many times, the more persnickety the formatting in a literary poem (not SF for some reason), the less value I take from it.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

“by the shape” huh?

Interesting. I’ve been playing with “shape” poems for precisely that reason lately. “Tripods” and “Gravestones” (appearing sometime soon on Every Day Poets) are both shape poems.

4 02 2009
cafenowhere

Lately my poems germinate from old memories I want to rehabilitate, each with a specific feeling and image. I have to work up to that image, so the first thought rarely manifests in the first line.

But the last poem I wrote that evolved from a line I kept repeating to myself, mulling over, was “Begging Auspices,” which begins with the imperative “Read the signs…”

Two songs I loved from the first line–“Oceans” by Rob Dickinson: “As far as I can see, you and I are valentines for all we know”–and “Shaken Baby” by Pernice Brothers: “Please don’t go, won’t you stay until I’m sleeping?”

I don’t know if they’re great first lines, but they grabbed me.

Interestingly enough, I can usually tell by the shape of a poem on a page if I will dislike it. Don’t even need to read the first line.

4 02 2009
cafenowhere

Lately my poems germinate from old memories I want to rehabilitate, each with a specific feeling and image. I have to work up to that image, so the first thought rarely manifests in the first line.

But the last poem I wrote that evolved from a line I kept repeating to myself, mulling over, was “Begging Auspices,” which begins with the imperative “Read the signs…”

Two songs I loved from the first line–“Oceans” by Rob Dickinson: “As far as I can see, you and I are valentines for all we know”–and “Shaken Baby” by Pernice Brothers: “Please don’t go, won’t you stay until I’m sleeping?”

I don’t know if they’re great first lines, but they grabbed me.

Interestingly enough, I can usually tell by the shape of a poem on a page if I will dislike it. Don’t even need to read the first line.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

“by the shape” huh?

Interesting. I’ve been playing with “shape” poems for precisely that reason lately. “Tripods” and “Gravestones” (appearing sometime soon on Every Day Poets) are both shape poems.

9 02 2009
cafenowhere

I wasn’t thinking of concrete poetry, which I actually admire when it takes on an unusual subject. I was thinking of poetry that makes me feel the poet tried to infuse meaning by tinkering with line and space instead of waiting until they had something worthwhile to say. So many times, the more persnickety the formatting in a literary poem (not SF for some reason), the less value I take from it.

9 02 2009
cafenowhere

I wasn’t thinking of concrete poetry, which I actually admire when it takes on an unusual subject. I was thinking of poetry that makes me feel the poet tried to infuse meaning by tinkering with line and space instead of waiting until they had something worthwhile to say. So many times, the more persnickety the formatting in a literary poem (not SF for some reason), the less value I take from it.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

“by the shape” huh?

Interesting. I’ve been playing with “shape” poems for precisely that reason lately. “Tripods” and “Gravestones” (appearing sometime soon on Every Day Poets) are both shape poems.

4 02 2009
cafenowhere

Lately my poems germinate from old memories I want to rehabilitate, each with a specific feeling and image. I have to work up to that image, so the first thought rarely manifests in the first line.

But the last poem I wrote that evolved from a line I kept repeating to myself, mulling over, was “Begging Auspices,” which begins with the imperative “Read the signs…”

Two songs I loved from the first line–“Oceans” by Rob Dickinson: “As far as I can see, you and I are valentines for all we know”–and “Shaken Baby” by Pernice Brothers: “Please don’t go, won’t you stay until I’m sleeping?”

I don’t know if they’re great first lines, but they grabbed me.

Interestingly enough, I can usually tell by the shape of a poem on a page if I will dislike it. Don’t even need to read the first line.

4 02 2009
cafenowhere

Lately my poems germinate from old memories I want to rehabilitate, each with a specific feeling and image. I have to work up to that image, so the first thought rarely manifests in the first line.

But the last poem I wrote that evolved from a line I kept repeating to myself, mulling over, was “Begging Auspices,” which begins with the imperative “Read the signs…”

Two songs I loved from the first line–“Oceans” by Rob Dickinson: “As far as I can see, you and I are valentines for all we know”–and “Shaken Baby” by Pernice Brothers: “Please don’t go, won’t you stay until I’m sleeping?”

I don’t know if they’re great first lines, but they grabbed me.

Interestingly enough, I can usually tell by the shape of a poem on a page if I will dislike it. Don’t even need to read the first line.

4 02 2009
cafenowhere

Lately my poems germinate from old memories I want to rehabilitate, each with a specific feeling and image. I have to work up to that image, so the first thought rarely manifests in the first line.

But the last poem I wrote that evolved from a line I kept repeating to myself, mulling over, was “Begging Auspices,” which begins with the imperative “Read the signs…”

Two songs I loved from the first line–“Oceans” by Rob Dickinson: “As far as I can see, you and I are valentines for all we know”–and “Shaken Baby” by Pernice Brothers: “Please don’t go, won’t you stay until I’m sleeping?”

I don’t know if they’re great first lines, but they grabbed me.

Interestingly enough, I can usually tell by the shape of a poem on a page if I will dislike it. Don’t even need to read the first line.

4 02 2009
cafenowhere

Lately my poems germinate from old memories I want to rehabilitate, each with a specific feeling and image. I have to work up to that image, so the first thought rarely manifests in the first line.

But the last poem I wrote that evolved from a line I kept repeating to myself, mulling over, was “Begging Auspices,” which begins with the imperative “Read the signs…”

Two songs I loved from the first line–“Oceans” by Rob Dickinson: “As far as I can see, you and I are valentines for all we know”–and “Shaken Baby” by Pernice Brothers: “Please don’t go, won’t you stay until I’m sleeping?”

I don’t know if they’re great first lines, but they grabbed me.

Interestingly enough, I can usually tell by the shape of a poem on a page if I will dislike it. Don’t even need to read the first line.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

“by the shape” huh?

Interesting. I’ve been playing with “shape” poems for precisely that reason lately. “Tripods” and “Gravestones” (appearing sometime soon on Every Day Poets) are both shape poems.

9 02 2009
cafenowhere

I wasn’t thinking of concrete poetry, which I actually admire when it takes on an unusual subject. I was thinking of poetry that makes me feel the poet tried to infuse meaning by tinkering with line and space instead of waiting until they had something worthwhile to say. So many times, the more persnickety the formatting in a literary poem (not SF for some reason), the less value I take from it.

4 02 2009
cafenowhere

Lately my poems germinate from old memories I want to rehabilitate, each with a specific feeling and image. I have to work up to that image, so the first thought rarely manifests in the first line.

But the last poem I wrote that evolved from a line I kept repeating to myself, mulling over, was “Begging Auspices,” which begins with the imperative “Read the signs…”

Two songs I loved from the first line–“Oceans” by Rob Dickinson: “As far as I can see, you and I are valentines for all we know”–and “Shaken Baby” by Pernice Brothers: “Please don’t go, won’t you stay until I’m sleeping?”

I don’t know if they’re great first lines, but they grabbed me.

Interestingly enough, I can usually tell by the shape of a poem on a page if I will dislike it. Don’t even need to read the first line.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

“by the shape” huh?

Interesting. I’ve been playing with “shape” poems for precisely that reason lately. “Tripods” and “Gravestones” (appearing sometime soon on Every Day Poets) are both shape poems.

9 02 2009
cafenowhere

I wasn’t thinking of concrete poetry, which I actually admire when it takes on an unusual subject. I was thinking of poetry that makes me feel the poet tried to infuse meaning by tinkering with line and space instead of waiting until they had something worthwhile to say. So many times, the more persnickety the formatting in a literary poem (not SF for some reason), the less value I take from it.

4 02 2009
cafenowhere

Lately my poems germinate from old memories I want to rehabilitate, each with a specific feeling and image. I have to work up to that image, so the first thought rarely manifests in the first line.
But the last poem I wrote that evolved from a line I kept repeating to myself, mulling over, was “Begging Auspices,” which begins with the imperative “Read the signs…”
Two songs I loved from the first line–“Oceans” by Rob Dickinson: “As far as I can see, you and I are valentines for all we know”–and “Shaken Baby” by Pernice Brothers: “Please don’t go, won’t you stay until I’m sleeping?”
I don’t know if they’re great first lines, but they grabbed me.
Interestingly enough, I can usually tell by the shape of a poem on a page if I will dislike it. Don’t even need to read the first line.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

“by the shape” huh?
Interesting. I’ve been playing with “shape” poems for precisely that reason lately. “Tripods” and “Gravestones” (appearing sometime soon on Every Day Poets) are both shape poems.

9 02 2009
cafenowhere

I wasn’t thinking of concrete poetry, which I actually admire when it takes on an unusual subject. I was thinking of poetry that makes me feel the poet tried to infuse meaning by tinkering with line and space instead of waiting until they had something worthwhile to say. So many times, the more persnickety the formatting in a literary poem (not SF for some reason), the less value I take from it.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

It makes me wanna finish that sentence. I’ll give it that much πŸ™‚

I, too, devoured Crichton when I was growing up. I always found it interesting that some of his best books (Eaters of the Dead, Sphere, Congo) turned out to be the worst movies.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

It makes me wanna finish that sentence. I’ll give it that much πŸ™‚

I, too, devoured Crichton when I was growing up. I always found it interesting that some of his best books (Eaters of the Dead, Sphere, Congo) turned out to be the worst movies.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

Great song!

I’ll have to check out that particular DC Guide.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

Great song!

I’ll have to check out that particular DC Guide.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

I’m thinking Texas…but now I’m not sure…

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

I’m thinking Texas…but now I’m not sure…

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

“by the shape” huh?

Interesting. I’ve been playing with “shape” poems for precisely that reason lately. “Tripods” and “Gravestones” (appearing sometime soon on Every Day Poets) are both shape poems.

8 02 2009
southernweirdo

“by the shape” huh?

Interesting. I’ve been playing with “shape” poems for precisely that reason lately. “Tripods” and “Gravestones” (appearing sometime soon on Every Day Poets) are both shape poems.

9 02 2009
cafenowhere

I wasn’t thinking of concrete poetry, which I actually admire when it takes on an unusual subject. I was thinking of poetry that makes me feel the poet tried to infuse meaning by tinkering with line and space instead of waiting until they had something worthwhile to say. So many times, the more persnickety the formatting in a literary poem (not SF for some reason), the less value I take from it.

9 02 2009
cafenowhere

I wasn’t thinking of concrete poetry, which I actually admire when it takes on an unusual subject. I was thinking of poetry that makes me feel the poet tried to infuse meaning by tinkering with line and space instead of waiting until they had something worthwhile to say. So many times, the more persnickety the formatting in a literary poem (not SF for some reason), the less value I take from it.

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