My Best of the Year List

7 12 2008

*In no particular order. Some items may be from previous years but new to me this year…

Books Enjoyed (I didn’t read as much as usual due to the ever-growing leaning pile of SFW slush):

*The Lone Star Reader, edited by Eric Marin — There is some great variety in this nicely illustrated collection.
*Soldier of Sidon, by Gene Wolf — I had been looking forward to this one and it didn’t disappoint. An amazing historical fantasy.
*The Magic Thief, by Sarah Prineas — A young adult book that was a good quick read. I’m looking forward to more in this series and reading them to my son when he has the attention span for something longer than a picture book.
*The Human Fly and Other Stories by T.C. Boyle — overall this collection geared to young adults was kind of hit and miss for me, but standouts like Greasy Lake and The Hit Man made it stick out for me.
*Can You See What I See? On a Scary Night by Walter Wick — an "I Spy" picture book that is really well done. My oldest and  I love these pictures and have had a lot of fun with this one. 

Music:

* Metallica, Death Magnetic — a welcome return to form. *Banging my head and playing air guitar wishing I had an awesome mullet…Seriously — it’s a great album.
* The Killers, Day and Age — Not quite as consistent as Sam’s Town, but a very good follow-up to that album in my opinion.
* Death Cab for Cutie, Narrow Stairs — I’m not sure if it was worth all the hype surrounding it (it got a little old quick for me), all the same, it was a solid album  for the first few listens with a few spectacular songs that I still enjoy. "Bixby Canyon Bridge" and "I Will Possess Your Heart" alone are worth the price of the album.
*Beck, Modern Guilt — Great! Great! Great! (….ahem….I really liked this one…) 
*Spongebob Squarepants, Best Day Ever — Patrick Star’s "Under my Rock" and the title song sung by Spongebob have been great sing-a-longs on those boring car trips with the kids.

Honorable Mentions — I haven’t heard the whole thing enough times to say for sure, but I’ve enjoyed Chinese Democracy by GNR. This year’s been kind of a timewarp getting me back in touch with my metal head roots with new albums (and good ones) from Metallica and GNR coming out.  I also enjoyed NIN’s latest album this year. Who knows? Maybe Iron Maiden, The Deftones, Tool, and Ministry will find a place on next year’s list? Too bad Pantera’s not around any more…These are angry times, they’d do well.

Movies:

*Wall-E — It had me smiling for the entire length of the movie. Despite the dystopian vision of the future, the movie has an optimism that is contagious.
*The Fall — a film that is both visually stunning and has heart. I came to it with reservations not having been a fan of The Cell, but this movie defied all of my expectations. The cinematographer deserves special credit.
*Forgetting Sarah Marshall — Simply silly. As an added bonus, the rock-opera truly rocks! 😉
*In the Valley of Elah — On one level, a really well-done murder mystery. On another level, this is a movie for our times the way The Deer Hunter was a movie for those suffering in the aftermath of Vietnam. The fact that it is based on a true story makes it all the more haunting.
*Kung Fu Panda — a hilarious and inspiring children’s movie. I wasn’t expecting much, but my family really enjoyed this one together.
*Run, Fatboy, Run — Nothing too deep, just an outright funny movie.
*Iron Man — who would have thought that Robert Downey, Jr., would have been such a great Tony Stark? This one defied expectations. The early terrorism scenes were a bit much for my son, however. I’ll get back to this later… 

Honorable Mentions: *not new but new to me this year* 28 Weeks Later, The Devil’s Backbone, Shooter (implausible, but fun, action romp — think Rambo/First Blood).

*A Special Note on The Dark Knight: Not really just The Dark Knight, but comic book movies in general. Do all comic book movie adaptions need to be so dark? Why must they all be so dreary and violent? Kids love these characters, but these movies are no longer made for kids. Did I enjoy The Dark Knight? Yes. Would I take me kids to see the fim? No! The advertising for the DVD release of the film is pretty incessant, often when my son is watching TV. He reallly wants to see that Batman/Joker movie. I have to tell him no. He asks me, "But I love Batman and the Joker?" I say "I understand. I did, too, when I was your age." He says, "But Batman and Joker are for kids." He’s backed up by all the Batman Legos, the Batman/Joker costumes for Halloween, the kids books/toys/merchandise related to The Dark Knight. The cereal box toys, even.  The same goes for Iron Man and the Hulk (which I did watch with my son). Cliche as it sounds, and I’m sure I’ve read this in a similar commentary somewhere — perhaps one of your blogs, I don’t know — but as the Joker asks, "Why so serious?"

Perhaps Hollywood needs to take another look at The Incredibles. Now, that was a great comic book movie! It wasn’tcorny or silly(the Fantastic 4 franchise comes to mind), but managed to be exciting and funny. Plus we could watch it as a family —  a movie like that can earn 4 ticket sales (me, wife, and 2 kids) to the box office instead of the 2 I pay to get my wife and I into the theater for these darker films. I have no problem buying Pixar merchandise for my kids, either.

I think The Dark Knight was an excellent film. However, I hate it did so well in some ways. Expect our comic book movies to grow darker/edgier with time. This may make for some entertaining movies for an adult audience, but it is a big pain in the bum for me as a dad.  

It wouldn’t bother me so much if Hollywood would market these films differently, but I guess whatever’s making money is all that matters in the end…

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135 responses

7 12 2008
sarah_prineas

Thanks for the shout-out!

My family LOVED Kung Fu Panda. We just watched it this week, and then watched the training montage about five times in a row.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

You’re more than welcome. Thanks for writing a good story. You did the hard part, after all.

That training montage makes me hungy…I think I’ll order some dumplings tonight…

7 12 2008
sarah_prineas

Thanks for the shout-out!

My family LOVED Kung Fu Panda. We just watched it this week, and then watched the training montage about five times in a row.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

You’re more than welcome. Thanks for writing a good story. You did the hard part, after all.

That training montage makes me hungy…I think I’ll order some dumplings tonight…

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

You’re more than welcome. Thanks for writing a good story. You did the hard part, after all.

That training montage makes me hungy…I think I’ll order some dumplings tonight…

7 12 2008
sarah_prineas

Thanks for the shout-out!

My family LOVED Kung Fu Panda. We just watched it this week, and then watched the training montage about five times in a row.

7 12 2008
sarah_prineas

Thanks for the shout-out!

My family LOVED Kung Fu Panda. We just watched it this week, and then watched the training montage about five times in a row.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

You’re more than welcome. Thanks for writing a good story. You did the hard part, after all.

That training montage makes me hungy…I think I’ll order some dumplings tonight…

7 12 2008
sarah_prineas

Thanks for the shout-out!

My family LOVED Kung Fu Panda. We just watched it this week, and then watched the training montage about five times in a row.

7 12 2008
sarah_prineas

Thanks for the shout-out!

My family LOVED Kung Fu Panda. We just watched it this week, and then watched the training montage about five times in a row.

7 12 2008
sarah_prineas

Thanks for the shout-out!

My family LOVED Kung Fu Panda. We just watched it this week, and then watched the training montage about five times in a row.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

You’re more than welcome. Thanks for writing a good story. You did the hard part, after all.

That training montage makes me hungy…I think I’ll order some dumplings tonight…

7 12 2008
sarah_prineas

Thanks for the shout-out!

My family LOVED Kung Fu Panda. We just watched it this week, and then watched the training montage about five times in a row.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

You’re more than welcome. Thanks for writing a good story. You did the hard part, after all.

That training montage makes me hungy…I think I’ll order some dumplings tonight…

7 12 2008
sarah_prineas

Thanks for the shout-out!
My family LOVED Kung Fu Panda. We just watched it this week, and then watched the training montage about five times in a row.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

You’re more than welcome. Thanks for writing a good story. You did the hard part, after all.
That training montage makes me hungy…I think I’ll order some dumplings tonight…

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

Actually, comic books today are actually very dark, and most of the time, NOT for kids. Just take a look at the Batman: Arkham Asylum and The Killing Joke Batman arcs, and you’ll see tehy are clearly not meant for children. In fact, comci books, especially Batman, haven’t been child-friendly since teh fifties. Now, the Incredibles were meant for children, but The Dark Knight’s biggest goers came from the mostly adult fan-base. It’s depressing that the kids probably can’t watch it, but there are plenty of TV shows on air or other comic movies that they could watch.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for your comments.

There are the excellent Batman: The Animated Series shows on and we’ll watch those from time to time. But my 5 year old knows that is not “The Dark Knight.” He’s begging to see the movie with the *real* joker (Ledger). When I try to explain it would scare him and it isn’t made for kids, he doesn’t understand. He shows me his cereal box toys and says, “but this is for kids” or something to that extent.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

Actually, comic books today are actually very dark, and most of the time, NOT for kids. Just take a look at the Batman: Arkham Asylum and The Killing Joke Batman arcs, and you’ll see tehy are clearly not meant for children. In fact, comci books, especially Batman, haven’t been child-friendly since teh fifties. Now, the Incredibles were meant for children, but The Dark Knight’s biggest goers came from the mostly adult fan-base. It’s depressing that the kids probably can’t watch it, but there are plenty of TV shows on air or other comic movies that they could watch.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for your comments.

There are the excellent Batman: The Animated Series shows on and we’ll watch those from time to time. But my 5 year old knows that is not “The Dark Knight.” He’s begging to see the movie with the *real* joker (Ledger). When I try to explain it would scare him and it isn’t made for kids, he doesn’t understand. He shows me his cereal box toys and says, “but this is for kids” or something to that extent.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for your comments.

There are the excellent Batman: The Animated Series shows on and we’ll watch those from time to time. But my 5 year old knows that is not “The Dark Knight.” He’s begging to see the movie with the *real* joker (Ledger). When I try to explain it would scare him and it isn’t made for kids, he doesn’t understand. He shows me his cereal box toys and says, “but this is for kids” or something to that extent.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

Actually, comic books today are actually very dark, and most of the time, NOT for kids. Just take a look at the Batman: Arkham Asylum and The Killing Joke Batman arcs, and you’ll see tehy are clearly not meant for children. In fact, comci books, especially Batman, haven’t been child-friendly since teh fifties. Now, the Incredibles were meant for children, but The Dark Knight’s biggest goers came from the mostly adult fan-base. It’s depressing that the kids probably can’t watch it, but there are plenty of TV shows on air or other comic movies that they could watch.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

Actually, comic books today are actually very dark, and most of the time, NOT for kids. Just take a look at the Batman: Arkham Asylum and The Killing Joke Batman arcs, and you’ll see tehy are clearly not meant for children. In fact, comci books, especially Batman, haven’t been child-friendly since teh fifties. Now, the Incredibles were meant for children, but The Dark Knight’s biggest goers came from the mostly adult fan-base. It’s depressing that the kids probably can’t watch it, but there are plenty of TV shows on air or other comic movies that they could watch.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for your comments.

There are the excellent Batman: The Animated Series shows on and we’ll watch those from time to time. But my 5 year old knows that is not “The Dark Knight.” He’s begging to see the movie with the *real* joker (Ledger). When I try to explain it would scare him and it isn’t made for kids, he doesn’t understand. He shows me his cereal box toys and says, “but this is for kids” or something to that extent.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

Actually, comic books today are actually very dark, and most of the time, NOT for kids. Just take a look at the Batman: Arkham Asylum and The Killing Joke Batman arcs, and you’ll see tehy are clearly not meant for children. In fact, comci books, especially Batman, haven’t been child-friendly since teh fifties. Now, the Incredibles were meant for children, but The Dark Knight’s biggest goers came from the mostly adult fan-base. It’s depressing that the kids probably can’t watch it, but there are plenty of TV shows on air or other comic movies that they could watch.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

Actually, comic books today are actually very dark, and most of the time, NOT for kids. Just take a look at the Batman: Arkham Asylum and The Killing Joke Batman arcs, and you’ll see tehy are clearly not meant for children. In fact, comci books, especially Batman, haven’t been child-friendly since teh fifties. Now, the Incredibles were meant for children, but The Dark Knight’s biggest goers came from the mostly adult fan-base. It’s depressing that the kids probably can’t watch it, but there are plenty of TV shows on air or other comic movies that they could watch.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

Actually, comic books today are actually very dark, and most of the time, NOT for kids. Just take a look at the Batman: Arkham Asylum and The Killing Joke Batman arcs, and you’ll see tehy are clearly not meant for children. In fact, comci books, especially Batman, haven’t been child-friendly since teh fifties. Now, the Incredibles were meant for children, but The Dark Knight’s biggest goers came from the mostly adult fan-base. It’s depressing that the kids probably can’t watch it, but there are plenty of TV shows on air or other comic movies that they could watch.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for your comments.

There are the excellent Batman: The Animated Series shows on and we’ll watch those from time to time. But my 5 year old knows that is not “The Dark Knight.” He’s begging to see the movie with the *real* joker (Ledger). When I try to explain it would scare him and it isn’t made for kids, he doesn’t understand. He shows me his cereal box toys and says, “but this is for kids” or something to that extent.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

Actually, comic books today are actually very dark, and most of the time, NOT for kids. Just take a look at the Batman: Arkham Asylum and The Killing Joke Batman arcs, and you’ll see tehy are clearly not meant for children. In fact, comci books, especially Batman, haven’t been child-friendly since teh fifties. Now, the Incredibles were meant for children, but The Dark Knight’s biggest goers came from the mostly adult fan-base. It’s depressing that the kids probably can’t watch it, but there are plenty of TV shows on air or other comic movies that they could watch.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for your comments.

There are the excellent Batman: The Animated Series shows on and we’ll watch those from time to time. But my 5 year old knows that is not “The Dark Knight.” He’s begging to see the movie with the *real* joker (Ledger). When I try to explain it would scare him and it isn’t made for kids, he doesn’t understand. He shows me his cereal box toys and says, “but this is for kids” or something to that extent.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

Actually, comic books today are actually very dark, and most of the time, NOT for kids. Just take a look at the Batman: Arkham Asylum and The Killing Joke Batman arcs, and you’ll see tehy are clearly not meant for children. In fact, comci books, especially Batman, haven’t been child-friendly since teh fifties. Now, the Incredibles were meant for children, but The Dark Knight’s biggest goers came from the mostly adult fan-base. It’s depressing that the kids probably can’t watch it, but there are plenty of TV shows on air or other comic movies that they could watch.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for your comments.
There are the excellent Batman: The Animated Series shows on and we’ll watch those from time to time. But my 5 year old knows that is not “The Dark Knight.” He’s begging to see the movie with the *real* joker (Ledger). When I try to explain it would scare him and it isn’t made for kids, he doesn’t understand. He shows me his cereal box toys and says, “but this is for kids” or something to that extent.

7 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Part of the problem, really, is that comics are no longer made for children. They’re increasingly becoming a niche hobby, marketed and geared for adults who have the income to afford their price.

It’s not like it used to be when we were kids. You ALWAYS saw kids buying comics. I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid in a comic book shop and I shop there all the time.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

What are you talking about? There are a TON of comics and more child-friendly versions of comics for kids, like Tiny Titans, Super Friends, and, although it’s been cancelled, Teen Titans Go!. And, like I’ve mentioned before, the Batman and Superman comics and the like haven’t been child-friendly since the 50’s. If you saw kids buying them as children, they were buying the teen-adult geared ones. Amd tehy still do, if you’re over twelve. And children aren’t that interested in comcis anymore, which is why DC is making dso many children-suited ones.

And comics aren’t that expensive…when Teen Titans Go! was still going, I paid no more that two or three dollars for it…

8 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Yes, some comics are still geared for children, but adults are the main people who buy them. And the price of a lot of the mainline comics are going up a dollar. I think that’s expensive, but YMMV according to your personal pocketbook…. 🙂

Anyway, I remember when comics were 15 cents, so anything compared to that is expensive to me now. Of course, I also had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways…. 😉

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Good points.

There are child-friendly comics. I can still find child-friendly issues of Spiderman, Hulk, and other comics on the shelf. My problem is actually not the content itself. It’s how that content is sold.

I guess my problem is more with the way movies (like the Dark Knight, Iron Man, etc.) written and filmed for a teenage/adult market are marketed so heavily towards young children (by toys, Legos, t-shirts, lunch boxes, book bags, cereal box prizes, etc.) who may not be the appropriate demographic for these films.

7 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Part of the problem, really, is that comics are no longer made for children. They’re increasingly becoming a niche hobby, marketed and geared for adults who have the income to afford their price.

It’s not like it used to be when we were kids. You ALWAYS saw kids buying comics. I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid in a comic book shop and I shop there all the time.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

What are you talking about? There are a TON of comics and more child-friendly versions of comics for kids, like Tiny Titans, Super Friends, and, although it’s been cancelled, Teen Titans Go!. And, like I’ve mentioned before, the Batman and Superman comics and the like haven’t been child-friendly since the 50’s. If you saw kids buying them as children, they were buying the teen-adult geared ones. Amd tehy still do, if you’re over twelve. And children aren’t that interested in comcis anymore, which is why DC is making dso many children-suited ones.

And comics aren’t that expensive…when Teen Titans Go! was still going, I paid no more that two or three dollars for it…

8 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Yes, some comics are still geared for children, but adults are the main people who buy them. And the price of a lot of the mainline comics are going up a dollar. I think that’s expensive, but YMMV according to your personal pocketbook…. 🙂

Anyway, I remember when comics were 15 cents, so anything compared to that is expensive to me now. Of course, I also had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways…. 😉

8 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Yes, some comics are still geared for children, but adults are the main people who buy them. And the price of a lot of the mainline comics are going up a dollar. I think that’s expensive, but YMMV according to your personal pocketbook…. 🙂

Anyway, I remember when comics were 15 cents, so anything compared to that is expensive to me now. Of course, I also had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways…. 😉

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

What are you talking about? There are a TON of comics and more child-friendly versions of comics for kids, like Tiny Titans, Super Friends, and, although it’s been cancelled, Teen Titans Go!. And, like I’ve mentioned before, the Batman and Superman comics and the like haven’t been child-friendly since the 50’s. If you saw kids buying them as children, they were buying the teen-adult geared ones. Amd tehy still do, if you’re over twelve. And children aren’t that interested in comcis anymore, which is why DC is making dso many children-suited ones.

And comics aren’t that expensive…when Teen Titans Go! was still going, I paid no more that two or three dollars for it…

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Good points.

There are child-friendly comics. I can still find child-friendly issues of Spiderman, Hulk, and other comics on the shelf. My problem is actually not the content itself. It’s how that content is sold.

I guess my problem is more with the way movies (like the Dark Knight, Iron Man, etc.) written and filmed for a teenage/adult market are marketed so heavily towards young children (by toys, Legos, t-shirts, lunch boxes, book bags, cereal box prizes, etc.) who may not be the appropriate demographic for these films.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Good points.

There are child-friendly comics. I can still find child-friendly issues of Spiderman, Hulk, and other comics on the shelf. My problem is actually not the content itself. It’s how that content is sold.

I guess my problem is more with the way movies (like the Dark Knight, Iron Man, etc.) written and filmed for a teenage/adult market are marketed so heavily towards young children (by toys, Legos, t-shirts, lunch boxes, book bags, cereal box prizes, etc.) who may not be the appropriate demographic for these films.

7 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Part of the problem, really, is that comics are no longer made for children. They’re increasingly becoming a niche hobby, marketed and geared for adults who have the income to afford their price.

It’s not like it used to be when we were kids. You ALWAYS saw kids buying comics. I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid in a comic book shop and I shop there all the time.

7 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Part of the problem, really, is that comics are no longer made for children. They’re increasingly becoming a niche hobby, marketed and geared for adults who have the income to afford their price.

It’s not like it used to be when we were kids. You ALWAYS saw kids buying comics. I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid in a comic book shop and I shop there all the time.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

What are you talking about? There are a TON of comics and more child-friendly versions of comics for kids, like Tiny Titans, Super Friends, and, although it’s been cancelled, Teen Titans Go!. And, like I’ve mentioned before, the Batman and Superman comics and the like haven’t been child-friendly since the 50’s. If you saw kids buying them as children, they were buying the teen-adult geared ones. Amd tehy still do, if you’re over twelve. And children aren’t that interested in comcis anymore, which is why DC is making dso many children-suited ones.

And comics aren’t that expensive…when Teen Titans Go! was still going, I paid no more that two or three dollars for it…

8 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Yes, some comics are still geared for children, but adults are the main people who buy them. And the price of a lot of the mainline comics are going up a dollar. I think that’s expensive, but YMMV according to your personal pocketbook…. 🙂

Anyway, I remember when comics were 15 cents, so anything compared to that is expensive to me now. Of course, I also had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways…. 😉

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Good points.

There are child-friendly comics. I can still find child-friendly issues of Spiderman, Hulk, and other comics on the shelf. My problem is actually not the content itself. It’s how that content is sold.

I guess my problem is more with the way movies (like the Dark Knight, Iron Man, etc.) written and filmed for a teenage/adult market are marketed so heavily towards young children (by toys, Legos, t-shirts, lunch boxes, book bags, cereal box prizes, etc.) who may not be the appropriate demographic for these films.

7 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Part of the problem, really, is that comics are no longer made for children. They’re increasingly becoming a niche hobby, marketed and geared for adults who have the income to afford their price.

It’s not like it used to be when we were kids. You ALWAYS saw kids buying comics. I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid in a comic book shop and I shop there all the time.

7 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Part of the problem, really, is that comics are no longer made for children. They’re increasingly becoming a niche hobby, marketed and geared for adults who have the income to afford their price.

It’s not like it used to be when we were kids. You ALWAYS saw kids buying comics. I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid in a comic book shop and I shop there all the time.

7 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Part of the problem, really, is that comics are no longer made for children. They’re increasingly becoming a niche hobby, marketed and geared for adults who have the income to afford their price.

It’s not like it used to be when we were kids. You ALWAYS saw kids buying comics. I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid in a comic book shop and I shop there all the time.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

What are you talking about? There are a TON of comics and more child-friendly versions of comics for kids, like Tiny Titans, Super Friends, and, although it’s been cancelled, Teen Titans Go!. And, like I’ve mentioned before, the Batman and Superman comics and the like haven’t been child-friendly since the 50’s. If you saw kids buying them as children, they were buying the teen-adult geared ones. Amd tehy still do, if you’re over twelve. And children aren’t that interested in comcis anymore, which is why DC is making dso many children-suited ones.

And comics aren’t that expensive…when Teen Titans Go! was still going, I paid no more that two or three dollars for it…

8 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Yes, some comics are still geared for children, but adults are the main people who buy them. And the price of a lot of the mainline comics are going up a dollar. I think that’s expensive, but YMMV according to your personal pocketbook…. 🙂

Anyway, I remember when comics were 15 cents, so anything compared to that is expensive to me now. Of course, I also had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways…. 😉

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Good points.

There are child-friendly comics. I can still find child-friendly issues of Spiderman, Hulk, and other comics on the shelf. My problem is actually not the content itself. It’s how that content is sold.

I guess my problem is more with the way movies (like the Dark Knight, Iron Man, etc.) written and filmed for a teenage/adult market are marketed so heavily towards young children (by toys, Legos, t-shirts, lunch boxes, book bags, cereal box prizes, etc.) who may not be the appropriate demographic for these films.

7 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Part of the problem, really, is that comics are no longer made for children. They’re increasingly becoming a niche hobby, marketed and geared for adults who have the income to afford their price.

It’s not like it used to be when we were kids. You ALWAYS saw kids buying comics. I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid in a comic book shop and I shop there all the time.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

What are you talking about? There are a TON of comics and more child-friendly versions of comics for kids, like Tiny Titans, Super Friends, and, although it’s been cancelled, Teen Titans Go!. And, like I’ve mentioned before, the Batman and Superman comics and the like haven’t been child-friendly since the 50’s. If you saw kids buying them as children, they were buying the teen-adult geared ones. Amd tehy still do, if you’re over twelve. And children aren’t that interested in comcis anymore, which is why DC is making dso many children-suited ones.

And comics aren’t that expensive…when Teen Titans Go! was still going, I paid no more that two or three dollars for it…

8 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Yes, some comics are still geared for children, but adults are the main people who buy them. And the price of a lot of the mainline comics are going up a dollar. I think that’s expensive, but YMMV according to your personal pocketbook…. 🙂

Anyway, I remember when comics were 15 cents, so anything compared to that is expensive to me now. Of course, I also had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways…. 😉

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Good points.

There are child-friendly comics. I can still find child-friendly issues of Spiderman, Hulk, and other comics on the shelf. My problem is actually not the content itself. It’s how that content is sold.

I guess my problem is more with the way movies (like the Dark Knight, Iron Man, etc.) written and filmed for a teenage/adult market are marketed so heavily towards young children (by toys, Legos, t-shirts, lunch boxes, book bags, cereal box prizes, etc.) who may not be the appropriate demographic for these films.

7 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Part of the problem, really, is that comics are no longer made for children. They’re increasingly becoming a niche hobby, marketed and geared for adults who have the income to afford their price.
It’s not like it used to be when we were kids. You ALWAYS saw kids buying comics. I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid in a comic book shop and I shop there all the time.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

What are you talking about? There are a TON of comics and more child-friendly versions of comics for kids, like Tiny Titans, Super Friends, and, although it’s been cancelled, Teen Titans Go!. And, like I’ve mentioned before, the Batman and Superman comics and the like haven’t been child-friendly since the 50’s. If you saw kids buying them as children, they were buying the teen-adult geared ones. Amd tehy still do, if you’re over twelve. And children aren’t that interested in comcis anymore, which is why DC is making dso many children-suited ones.
And comics aren’t that expensive…when Teen Titans Go! was still going, I paid no more that two or three dollars for it…

8 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Yes, some comics are still geared for children, but adults are the main people who buy them. And the price of a lot of the mainline comics are going up a dollar. I think that’s expensive, but YMMV according to your personal pocketbook…. 🙂
Anyway, I remember when comics were 15 cents, so anything compared to that is expensive to me now. Of course, I also had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways…. 😉

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Good points.
There are child-friendly comics. I can still find child-friendly issues of Spiderman, Hulk, and other comics on the shelf. My problem is actually not the content itself. It’s how that content is sold.
I guess my problem is more with the way movies (like the Dark Knight, Iron Man, etc.) written and filmed for a teenage/adult market are marketed so heavily towards young children (by toys, Legos, t-shirts, lunch boxes, book bags, cereal box prizes, etc.) who may not be the appropriate demographic for these films.

7 12 2008
ericmarin

Thanks for recommending The Lone Star Stories Reader, T.J.! I’m glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for putting it out, Eric.

7 12 2008
ericmarin

Thanks for recommending The Lone Star Stories Reader, T.J.! I’m glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for putting it out, Eric.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for putting it out, Eric.

7 12 2008
ericmarin

Thanks for recommending The Lone Star Stories Reader, T.J.! I’m glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

7 12 2008
ericmarin

Thanks for recommending The Lone Star Stories Reader, T.J.! I’m glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for putting it out, Eric.

7 12 2008
ericmarin

Thanks for recommending The Lone Star Stories Reader, T.J.! I’m glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

7 12 2008
ericmarin

Thanks for recommending The Lone Star Stories Reader, T.J.! I’m glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

7 12 2008
ericmarin

Thanks for recommending The Lone Star Stories Reader, T.J.! I’m glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for putting it out, Eric.

7 12 2008
ericmarin

Thanks for recommending The Lone Star Stories Reader, T.J.! I’m glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for putting it out, Eric.

7 12 2008
ericmarin

Thanks for recommending The Lone Star Stories Reader, T.J.! I’m glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for putting it out, Eric.

7 12 2008
bearleyport

Robert Cormier is one of my favorite authors, and not for nothing does his work show up on most lists of censored books. Our society has a very high tolerance for violence in children’s “entertainment,” so long as it isn’t taken seriously, and I think there are tragic, real life consequences when people fail to take violence seriously. Why should it ever be “light” or “comic” to wave a gun around or punch somebody in the face?

My favorites include AFTER THE FIRST DEATH and THE RAG AND BONE SHOP.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

I haven’t read him in many years, but I enjoyed Cormier as well.

As always, a good point. Thanks for your perspective on this. You’re right and I agree with you in many ways. I think that’s why I prefer Spiderman when it comes to comics for my kids. He never tries to kill anyone (in the age-appropriate comics anyway) and his weapons are webs. He wants to capture and not kill the villains. Hulk never uses weapons and the violence is a part of him that is out of control. Hulk, honestly, has been great in helping me explain why it is important to keep our tempers in check with my five year old. I think the Hulk is really just a big toddler.

Violence saturates our society so much. It’s nuts to me that some of the same parents up in arms a few years back at Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” freaked out that their child may have seen a nipple are the same ones who have no qualms with taking their children to Lord of the Rings and Superhero movies no matter the level of violence.

It’s odd to me that in a primetime episode of CSI or House (both shows I enjoy) you can have scenes of violence as bad as some of Cronenburg’s stuff from the 80’s (bodies ripped open). But the naked human body offends so many people. I really just…I don’t get it.

Honestly, I’d rather my kid see a naked woman or man on television than a man missing a head, random body parts, or human innards. We are an odd society in terms of what we find offensive. Why is the naked outside of a complete and healthy body more offensive than insides ripped bare? Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?”

Why is execution legal, and not gay marriage?

Where do most Americans look for morality? I think you’ll find violence and suffering “justified” in that book of contradictions, with sex for pleasure discouraged (by the mutilation of sex organs, even) and nakedness something to be ashamed of (look up the word “pudendum,” it means: shame).

Our society does not value the golden rule, “let he who is without sin…” or “love thy neighbor” so much. Lessons perhaps incompatible with the American dream, that scramble to get on top of the heap, to live in the lap of luxury. ‘Tis the season.

I think children are bombarded by sexual messages, too. Not graphic scenes, but situations as divorced from their consequences as the violence. For ex., sitcoms that make a joke of promiscuity, often without any talk of condoms or STDs.

I wonder if the recurring messages of violence and sex in the media doesn’t reinforce a sense of chivalry, men using violence to protect and have power of women, along with the illusion that sex gives women power over men. It’s about division, hierarchy, and exploitation.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“men using violence to protect and have power of women”

That should be

men using violence to “protect” and have power of women

8 12 2008
bearleyport

power _over_ women

I mistook this fuzzy gray mold for my brain… but, alas! it’s all I’ve got.

7 12 2008
bearleyport

Robert Cormier is one of my favorite authors, and not for nothing does his work show up on most lists of censored books. Our society has a very high tolerance for violence in children’s “entertainment,” so long as it isn’t taken seriously, and I think there are tragic, real life consequences when people fail to take violence seriously. Why should it ever be “light” or “comic” to wave a gun around or punch somebody in the face?

My favorites include AFTER THE FIRST DEATH and THE RAG AND BONE SHOP.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

I haven’t read him in many years, but I enjoyed Cormier as well.

As always, a good point. Thanks for your perspective on this. You’re right and I agree with you in many ways. I think that’s why I prefer Spiderman when it comes to comics for my kids. He never tries to kill anyone (in the age-appropriate comics anyway) and his weapons are webs. He wants to capture and not kill the villains. Hulk never uses weapons and the violence is a part of him that is out of control. Hulk, honestly, has been great in helping me explain why it is important to keep our tempers in check with my five year old. I think the Hulk is really just a big toddler.

Violence saturates our society so much. It’s nuts to me that some of the same parents up in arms a few years back at Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” freaked out that their child may have seen a nipple are the same ones who have no qualms with taking their children to Lord of the Rings and Superhero movies no matter the level of violence.

It’s odd to me that in a primetime episode of CSI or House (both shows I enjoy) you can have scenes of violence as bad as some of Cronenburg’s stuff from the 80’s (bodies ripped open). But the naked human body offends so many people. I really just…I don’t get it.

Honestly, I’d rather my kid see a naked woman or man on television than a man missing a head, random body parts, or human innards. We are an odd society in terms of what we find offensive. Why is the naked outside of a complete and healthy body more offensive than insides ripped bare? Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?”

Why is execution legal, and not gay marriage?

Where do most Americans look for morality? I think you’ll find violence and suffering “justified” in that book of contradictions, with sex for pleasure discouraged (by the mutilation of sex organs, even) and nakedness something to be ashamed of (look up the word “pudendum,” it means: shame).

Our society does not value the golden rule, “let he who is without sin…” or “love thy neighbor” so much. Lessons perhaps incompatible with the American dream, that scramble to get on top of the heap, to live in the lap of luxury. ‘Tis the season.

I think children are bombarded by sexual messages, too. Not graphic scenes, but situations as divorced from their consequences as the violence. For ex., sitcoms that make a joke of promiscuity, often without any talk of condoms or STDs.

I wonder if the recurring messages of violence and sex in the media doesn’t reinforce a sense of chivalry, men using violence to protect and have power of women, along with the illusion that sex gives women power over men. It’s about division, hierarchy, and exploitation.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“men using violence to protect and have power of women”

That should be

men using violence to “protect” and have power of women

8 12 2008
bearleyport

power _over_ women

I mistook this fuzzy gray mold for my brain… but, alas! it’s all I’ve got.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

power _over_ women

I mistook this fuzzy gray mold for my brain… but, alas! it’s all I’ve got.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“men using violence to protect and have power of women”

That should be

men using violence to “protect” and have power of women

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?”

Why is execution legal, and not gay marriage?

Where do most Americans look for morality? I think you’ll find violence and suffering “justified” in that book of contradictions, with sex for pleasure discouraged (by the mutilation of sex organs, even) and nakedness something to be ashamed of (look up the word “pudendum,” it means: shame).

Our society does not value the golden rule, “let he who is without sin…” or “love thy neighbor” so much. Lessons perhaps incompatible with the American dream, that scramble to get on top of the heap, to live in the lap of luxury. ‘Tis the season.

I think children are bombarded by sexual messages, too. Not graphic scenes, but situations as divorced from their consequences as the violence. For ex., sitcoms that make a joke of promiscuity, often without any talk of condoms or STDs.

I wonder if the recurring messages of violence and sex in the media doesn’t reinforce a sense of chivalry, men using violence to protect and have power of women, along with the illusion that sex gives women power over men. It’s about division, hierarchy, and exploitation.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

I haven’t read him in many years, but I enjoyed Cormier as well.

As always, a good point. Thanks for your perspective on this. You’re right and I agree with you in many ways. I think that’s why I prefer Spiderman when it comes to comics for my kids. He never tries to kill anyone (in the age-appropriate comics anyway) and his weapons are webs. He wants to capture and not kill the villains. Hulk never uses weapons and the violence is a part of him that is out of control. Hulk, honestly, has been great in helping me explain why it is important to keep our tempers in check with my five year old. I think the Hulk is really just a big toddler.

Violence saturates our society so much. It’s nuts to me that some of the same parents up in arms a few years back at Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” freaked out that their child may have seen a nipple are the same ones who have no qualms with taking their children to Lord of the Rings and Superhero movies no matter the level of violence.

It’s odd to me that in a primetime episode of CSI or House (both shows I enjoy) you can have scenes of violence as bad as some of Cronenburg’s stuff from the 80’s (bodies ripped open). But the naked human body offends so many people. I really just…I don’t get it.

Honestly, I’d rather my kid see a naked woman or man on television than a man missing a head, random body parts, or human innards. We are an odd society in terms of what we find offensive. Why is the naked outside of a complete and healthy body more offensive than insides ripped bare? Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?

7 12 2008
bearleyport

Robert Cormier is one of my favorite authors, and not for nothing does his work show up on most lists of censored books. Our society has a very high tolerance for violence in children’s “entertainment,” so long as it isn’t taken seriously, and I think there are tragic, real life consequences when people fail to take violence seriously. Why should it ever be “light” or “comic” to wave a gun around or punch somebody in the face?

My favorites include AFTER THE FIRST DEATH and THE RAG AND BONE SHOP.

7 12 2008
bearleyport

Robert Cormier is one of my favorite authors, and not for nothing does his work show up on most lists of censored books. Our society has a very high tolerance for violence in children’s “entertainment,” so long as it isn’t taken seriously, and I think there are tragic, real life consequences when people fail to take violence seriously. Why should it ever be “light” or “comic” to wave a gun around or punch somebody in the face?

My favorites include AFTER THE FIRST DEATH and THE RAG AND BONE SHOP.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

I haven’t read him in many years, but I enjoyed Cormier as well.

As always, a good point. Thanks for your perspective on this. You’re right and I agree with you in many ways. I think that’s why I prefer Spiderman when it comes to comics for my kids. He never tries to kill anyone (in the age-appropriate comics anyway) and his weapons are webs. He wants to capture and not kill the villains. Hulk never uses weapons and the violence is a part of him that is out of control. Hulk, honestly, has been great in helping me explain why it is important to keep our tempers in check with my five year old. I think the Hulk is really just a big toddler.

Violence saturates our society so much. It’s nuts to me that some of the same parents up in arms a few years back at Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” freaked out that their child may have seen a nipple are the same ones who have no qualms with taking their children to Lord of the Rings and Superhero movies no matter the level of violence.

It’s odd to me that in a primetime episode of CSI or House (both shows I enjoy) you can have scenes of violence as bad as some of Cronenburg’s stuff from the 80’s (bodies ripped open). But the naked human body offends so many people. I really just…I don’t get it.

Honestly, I’d rather my kid see a naked woman or man on television than a man missing a head, random body parts, or human innards. We are an odd society in terms of what we find offensive. Why is the naked outside of a complete and healthy body more offensive than insides ripped bare? Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?”

Why is execution legal, and not gay marriage?

Where do most Americans look for morality? I think you’ll find violence and suffering “justified” in that book of contradictions, with sex for pleasure discouraged (by the mutilation of sex organs, even) and nakedness something to be ashamed of (look up the word “pudendum,” it means: shame).

Our society does not value the golden rule, “let he who is without sin…” or “love thy neighbor” so much. Lessons perhaps incompatible with the American dream, that scramble to get on top of the heap, to live in the lap of luxury. ‘Tis the season.

I think children are bombarded by sexual messages, too. Not graphic scenes, but situations as divorced from their consequences as the violence. For ex., sitcoms that make a joke of promiscuity, often without any talk of condoms or STDs.

I wonder if the recurring messages of violence and sex in the media doesn’t reinforce a sense of chivalry, men using violence to protect and have power of women, along with the illusion that sex gives women power over men. It’s about division, hierarchy, and exploitation.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“men using violence to protect and have power of women”

That should be

men using violence to “protect” and have power of women

8 12 2008
bearleyport

power _over_ women

I mistook this fuzzy gray mold for my brain… but, alas! it’s all I’ve got.

7 12 2008
bearleyport

Robert Cormier is one of my favorite authors, and not for nothing does his work show up on most lists of censored books. Our society has a very high tolerance for violence in children’s “entertainment,” so long as it isn’t taken seriously, and I think there are tragic, real life consequences when people fail to take violence seriously. Why should it ever be “light” or “comic” to wave a gun around or punch somebody in the face?

My favorites include AFTER THE FIRST DEATH and THE RAG AND BONE SHOP.

7 12 2008
bearleyport

Robert Cormier is one of my favorite authors, and not for nothing does his work show up on most lists of censored books. Our society has a very high tolerance for violence in children’s “entertainment,” so long as it isn’t taken seriously, and I think there are tragic, real life consequences when people fail to take violence seriously. Why should it ever be “light” or “comic” to wave a gun around or punch somebody in the face?

My favorites include AFTER THE FIRST DEATH and THE RAG AND BONE SHOP.

7 12 2008
bearleyport

Robert Cormier is one of my favorite authors, and not for nothing does his work show up on most lists of censored books. Our society has a very high tolerance for violence in children’s “entertainment,” so long as it isn’t taken seriously, and I think there are tragic, real life consequences when people fail to take violence seriously. Why should it ever be “light” or “comic” to wave a gun around or punch somebody in the face?

My favorites include AFTER THE FIRST DEATH and THE RAG AND BONE SHOP.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

I haven’t read him in many years, but I enjoyed Cormier as well.

As always, a good point. Thanks for your perspective on this. You’re right and I agree with you in many ways. I think that’s why I prefer Spiderman when it comes to comics for my kids. He never tries to kill anyone (in the age-appropriate comics anyway) and his weapons are webs. He wants to capture and not kill the villains. Hulk never uses weapons and the violence is a part of him that is out of control. Hulk, honestly, has been great in helping me explain why it is important to keep our tempers in check with my five year old. I think the Hulk is really just a big toddler.

Violence saturates our society so much. It’s nuts to me that some of the same parents up in arms a few years back at Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” freaked out that their child may have seen a nipple are the same ones who have no qualms with taking their children to Lord of the Rings and Superhero movies no matter the level of violence.

It’s odd to me that in a primetime episode of CSI or House (both shows I enjoy) you can have scenes of violence as bad as some of Cronenburg’s stuff from the 80’s (bodies ripped open). But the naked human body offends so many people. I really just…I don’t get it.

Honestly, I’d rather my kid see a naked woman or man on television than a man missing a head, random body parts, or human innards. We are an odd society in terms of what we find offensive. Why is the naked outside of a complete and healthy body more offensive than insides ripped bare? Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?”

Why is execution legal, and not gay marriage?

Where do most Americans look for morality? I think you’ll find violence and suffering “justified” in that book of contradictions, with sex for pleasure discouraged (by the mutilation of sex organs, even) and nakedness something to be ashamed of (look up the word “pudendum,” it means: shame).

Our society does not value the golden rule, “let he who is without sin…” or “love thy neighbor” so much. Lessons perhaps incompatible with the American dream, that scramble to get on top of the heap, to live in the lap of luxury. ‘Tis the season.

I think children are bombarded by sexual messages, too. Not graphic scenes, but situations as divorced from their consequences as the violence. For ex., sitcoms that make a joke of promiscuity, often without any talk of condoms or STDs.

I wonder if the recurring messages of violence and sex in the media doesn’t reinforce a sense of chivalry, men using violence to protect and have power of women, along with the illusion that sex gives women power over men. It’s about division, hierarchy, and exploitation.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“men using violence to protect and have power of women”

That should be

men using violence to “protect” and have power of women

8 12 2008
bearleyport

power _over_ women

I mistook this fuzzy gray mold for my brain… but, alas! it’s all I’ve got.

7 12 2008
bearleyport

Robert Cormier is one of my favorite authors, and not for nothing does his work show up on most lists of censored books. Our society has a very high tolerance for violence in children’s “entertainment,” so long as it isn’t taken seriously, and I think there are tragic, real life consequences when people fail to take violence seriously. Why should it ever be “light” or “comic” to wave a gun around or punch somebody in the face?

My favorites include AFTER THE FIRST DEATH and THE RAG AND BONE SHOP.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

I haven’t read him in many years, but I enjoyed Cormier as well.

As always, a good point. Thanks for your perspective on this. You’re right and I agree with you in many ways. I think that’s why I prefer Spiderman when it comes to comics for my kids. He never tries to kill anyone (in the age-appropriate comics anyway) and his weapons are webs. He wants to capture and not kill the villains. Hulk never uses weapons and the violence is a part of him that is out of control. Hulk, honestly, has been great in helping me explain why it is important to keep our tempers in check with my five year old. I think the Hulk is really just a big toddler.

Violence saturates our society so much. It’s nuts to me that some of the same parents up in arms a few years back at Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” freaked out that their child may have seen a nipple are the same ones who have no qualms with taking their children to Lord of the Rings and Superhero movies no matter the level of violence.

It’s odd to me that in a primetime episode of CSI or House (both shows I enjoy) you can have scenes of violence as bad as some of Cronenburg’s stuff from the 80’s (bodies ripped open). But the naked human body offends so many people. I really just…I don’t get it.

Honestly, I’d rather my kid see a naked woman or man on television than a man missing a head, random body parts, or human innards. We are an odd society in terms of what we find offensive. Why is the naked outside of a complete and healthy body more offensive than insides ripped bare? Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?”

Why is execution legal, and not gay marriage?

Where do most Americans look for morality? I think you’ll find violence and suffering “justified” in that book of contradictions, with sex for pleasure discouraged (by the mutilation of sex organs, even) and nakedness something to be ashamed of (look up the word “pudendum,” it means: shame).

Our society does not value the golden rule, “let he who is without sin…” or “love thy neighbor” so much. Lessons perhaps incompatible with the American dream, that scramble to get on top of the heap, to live in the lap of luxury. ‘Tis the season.

I think children are bombarded by sexual messages, too. Not graphic scenes, but situations as divorced from their consequences as the violence. For ex., sitcoms that make a joke of promiscuity, often without any talk of condoms or STDs.

I wonder if the recurring messages of violence and sex in the media doesn’t reinforce a sense of chivalry, men using violence to protect and have power of women, along with the illusion that sex gives women power over men. It’s about division, hierarchy, and exploitation.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“men using violence to protect and have power of women”

That should be

men using violence to “protect” and have power of women

8 12 2008
bearleyport

power _over_ women

I mistook this fuzzy gray mold for my brain… but, alas! it’s all I’ve got.

7 12 2008
bearleyport

Robert Cormier is one of my favorite authors, and not for nothing does his work show up on most lists of censored books. Our society has a very high tolerance for violence in children’s “entertainment,” so long as it isn’t taken seriously, and I think there are tragic, real life consequences when people fail to take violence seriously. Why should it ever be “light” or “comic” to wave a gun around or punch somebody in the face?
My favorites include AFTER THE FIRST DEATH and THE RAG AND BONE SHOP.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

I haven’t read him in many years, but I enjoyed Cormier as well.
As always, a good point. Thanks for your perspective on this. You’re right and I agree with you in many ways. I think that’s why I prefer Spiderman when it comes to comics for my kids. He never tries to kill anyone (in the age-appropriate comics anyway) and his weapons are webs. He wants to capture and not kill the villains. Hulk never uses weapons and the violence is a part of him that is out of control. Hulk, honestly, has been great in helping me explain why it is important to keep our tempers in check with my five year old. I think the Hulk is really just a big toddler.
Violence saturates our society so much. It’s nuts to me that some of the same parents up in arms a few years back at Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” freaked out that their child may have seen a nipple are the same ones who have no qualms with taking their children to Lord of the Rings and Superhero movies no matter the level of violence.
It’s odd to me that in a primetime episode of CSI or House (both shows I enjoy) you can have scenes of violence as bad as some of Cronenburg’s stuff from the 80’s (bodies ripped open). But the naked human body offends so many people. I really just…I don’t get it.
Honestly, I’d rather my kid see a naked woman or man on television than a man missing a head, random body parts, or human innards. We are an odd society in terms of what we find offensive. Why is the naked outside of a complete and healthy body more offensive than insides ripped bare? Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?”
Why is execution legal, and not gay marriage?
Where do most Americans look for morality? I think you’ll find violence and suffering “justified” in that book of contradictions, with sex for pleasure discouraged (by the mutilation of sex organs, even) and nakedness something to be ashamed of (look up the word “pudendum,” it means: shame).
Our society does not value the golden rule, “let he who is without sin…” or “love thy neighbor” so much. Lessons perhaps incompatible with the American dream, that scramble to get on top of the heap, to live in the lap of luxury. ‘Tis the season.
I think children are bombarded by sexual messages, too. Not graphic scenes, but situations as divorced from their consequences as the violence. For ex., sitcoms that make a joke of promiscuity, often without any talk of condoms or STDs.
I wonder if the recurring messages of violence and sex in the media doesn’t reinforce a sense of chivalry, men using violence to protect and have power of women, along with the illusion that sex gives women power over men. It’s about division, hierarchy, and exploitation.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“men using violence to protect and have power of women”
That should be
men using violence to “protect” and have power of women

8 12 2008
bearleyport

power _over_ women
I mistook this fuzzy gray mold for my brain… but, alas! it’s all I’ve got.

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

What are you talking about? There are a TON of comics and more child-friendly versions of comics for kids, like Tiny Titans, Super Friends, and, although it’s been cancelled, Teen Titans Go!. And, like I’ve mentioned before, the Batman and Superman comics and the like haven’t been child-friendly since the 50’s. If you saw kids buying them as children, they were buying the teen-adult geared ones. Amd tehy still do, if you’re over twelve. And children aren’t that interested in comcis anymore, which is why DC is making dso many children-suited ones.

And comics aren’t that expensive…when Teen Titans Go! was still going, I paid no more that two or three dollars for it…

7 12 2008
tauruschick12

What are you talking about? There are a TON of comics and more child-friendly versions of comics for kids, like Tiny Titans, Super Friends, and, although it’s been cancelled, Teen Titans Go!. And, like I’ve mentioned before, the Batman and Superman comics and the like haven’t been child-friendly since the 50’s. If you saw kids buying them as children, they were buying the teen-adult geared ones. Amd tehy still do, if you’re over twelve. And children aren’t that interested in comcis anymore, which is why DC is making dso many children-suited ones.

And comics aren’t that expensive…when Teen Titans Go! was still going, I paid no more that two or three dollars for it…

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

You’re more than welcome. Thanks for writing a good story. You did the hard part, after all.

That training montage makes me hungy…I think I’ll order some dumplings tonight…

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

You’re more than welcome. Thanks for writing a good story. You did the hard part, after all.

That training montage makes me hungy…I think I’ll order some dumplings tonight…

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for your comments.

There are the excellent Batman: The Animated Series shows on and we’ll watch those from time to time. But my 5 year old knows that is not “The Dark Knight.” He’s begging to see the movie with the *real* joker (Ledger). When I try to explain it would scare him and it isn’t made for kids, he doesn’t understand. He shows me his cereal box toys and says, “but this is for kids” or something to that extent.

7 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for your comments.

There are the excellent Batman: The Animated Series shows on and we’ll watch those from time to time. But my 5 year old knows that is not “The Dark Knight.” He’s begging to see the movie with the *real* joker (Ledger). When I try to explain it would scare him and it isn’t made for kids, he doesn’t understand. He shows me his cereal box toys and says, “but this is for kids” or something to that extent.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

I haven’t read him in many years, but I enjoyed Cormier as well.

As always, a good point. Thanks for your perspective on this. You’re right and I agree with you in many ways. I think that’s why I prefer Spiderman when it comes to comics for my kids. He never tries to kill anyone (in the age-appropriate comics anyway) and his weapons are webs. He wants to capture and not kill the villains. Hulk never uses weapons and the violence is a part of him that is out of control. Hulk, honestly, has been great in helping me explain why it is important to keep our tempers in check with my five year old. I think the Hulk is really just a big toddler.

Violence saturates our society so much. It’s nuts to me that some of the same parents up in arms a few years back at Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” freaked out that their child may have seen a nipple are the same ones who have no qualms with taking their children to Lord of the Rings and Superhero movies no matter the level of violence.

It’s odd to me that in a primetime episode of CSI or House (both shows I enjoy) you can have scenes of violence as bad as some of Cronenburg’s stuff from the 80’s (bodies ripped open). But the naked human body offends so many people. I really just…I don’t get it.

Honestly, I’d rather my kid see a naked woman or man on television than a man missing a head, random body parts, or human innards. We are an odd society in terms of what we find offensive. Why is the naked outside of a complete and healthy body more offensive than insides ripped bare? Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

I haven’t read him in many years, but I enjoyed Cormier as well.

As always, a good point. Thanks for your perspective on this. You’re right and I agree with you in many ways. I think that’s why I prefer Spiderman when it comes to comics for my kids. He never tries to kill anyone (in the age-appropriate comics anyway) and his weapons are webs. He wants to capture and not kill the villains. Hulk never uses weapons and the violence is a part of him that is out of control. Hulk, honestly, has been great in helping me explain why it is important to keep our tempers in check with my five year old. I think the Hulk is really just a big toddler.

Violence saturates our society so much. It’s nuts to me that some of the same parents up in arms a few years back at Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” freaked out that their child may have seen a nipple are the same ones who have no qualms with taking their children to Lord of the Rings and Superhero movies no matter the level of violence.

It’s odd to me that in a primetime episode of CSI or House (both shows I enjoy) you can have scenes of violence as bad as some of Cronenburg’s stuff from the 80’s (bodies ripped open). But the naked human body offends so many people. I really just…I don’t get it.

Honestly, I’d rather my kid see a naked woman or man on television than a man missing a head, random body parts, or human innards. We are an odd society in terms of what we find offensive. Why is the naked outside of a complete and healthy body more offensive than insides ripped bare? Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Good points.

There are child-friendly comics. I can still find child-friendly issues of Spiderman, Hulk, and other comics on the shelf. My problem is actually not the content itself. It’s how that content is sold.

I guess my problem is more with the way movies (like the Dark Knight, Iron Man, etc.) written and filmed for a teenage/adult market are marketed so heavily towards young children (by toys, Legos, t-shirts, lunch boxes, book bags, cereal box prizes, etc.) who may not be the appropriate demographic for these films.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Good points.

There are child-friendly comics. I can still find child-friendly issues of Spiderman, Hulk, and other comics on the shelf. My problem is actually not the content itself. It’s how that content is sold.

I guess my problem is more with the way movies (like the Dark Knight, Iron Man, etc.) written and filmed for a teenage/adult market are marketed so heavily towards young children (by toys, Legos, t-shirts, lunch boxes, book bags, cereal box prizes, etc.) who may not be the appropriate demographic for these films.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for putting it out, Eric.

8 12 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for putting it out, Eric.

8 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Yes, some comics are still geared for children, but adults are the main people who buy them. And the price of a lot of the mainline comics are going up a dollar. I think that’s expensive, but YMMV according to your personal pocketbook…. 🙂

Anyway, I remember when comics were 15 cents, so anything compared to that is expensive to me now. Of course, I also had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways…. 😉

8 12 2008
kmarkhoover

Yes, some comics are still geared for children, but adults are the main people who buy them. And the price of a lot of the mainline comics are going up a dollar. I think that’s expensive, but YMMV according to your personal pocketbook…. 🙂

Anyway, I remember when comics were 15 cents, so anything compared to that is expensive to me now. Of course, I also had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways…. 😉

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?”

Why is execution legal, and not gay marriage?

Where do most Americans look for morality? I think you’ll find violence and suffering “justified” in that book of contradictions, with sex for pleasure discouraged (by the mutilation of sex organs, even) and nakedness something to be ashamed of (look up the word “pudendum,” it means: shame).

Our society does not value the golden rule, “let he who is without sin…” or “love thy neighbor” so much. Lessons perhaps incompatible with the American dream, that scramble to get on top of the heap, to live in the lap of luxury. ‘Tis the season.

I think children are bombarded by sexual messages, too. Not graphic scenes, but situations as divorced from their consequences as the violence. For ex., sitcoms that make a joke of promiscuity, often without any talk of condoms or STDs.

I wonder if the recurring messages of violence and sex in the media doesn’t reinforce a sense of chivalry, men using violence to protect and have power of women, along with the illusion that sex gives women power over men. It’s about division, hierarchy, and exploitation.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“Why is a brutal televised murder more socially acceptable than a sex scene?”

Why is execution legal, and not gay marriage?

Where do most Americans look for morality? I think you’ll find violence and suffering “justified” in that book of contradictions, with sex for pleasure discouraged (by the mutilation of sex organs, even) and nakedness something to be ashamed of (look up the word “pudendum,” it means: shame).

Our society does not value the golden rule, “let he who is without sin…” or “love thy neighbor” so much. Lessons perhaps incompatible with the American dream, that scramble to get on top of the heap, to live in the lap of luxury. ‘Tis the season.

I think children are bombarded by sexual messages, too. Not graphic scenes, but situations as divorced from their consequences as the violence. For ex., sitcoms that make a joke of promiscuity, often without any talk of condoms or STDs.

I wonder if the recurring messages of violence and sex in the media doesn’t reinforce a sense of chivalry, men using violence to protect and have power of women, along with the illusion that sex gives women power over men. It’s about division, hierarchy, and exploitation.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“men using violence to protect and have power of women”

That should be

men using violence to “protect” and have power of women

8 12 2008
bearleyport

“men using violence to protect and have power of women”

That should be

men using violence to “protect” and have power of women

8 12 2008
bearleyport

power _over_ women

I mistook this fuzzy gray mold for my brain… but, alas! it’s all I’ve got.

8 12 2008
bearleyport

power _over_ women

I mistook this fuzzy gray mold for my brain… but, alas! it’s all I’ve got.

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