SFW Needs:

4 05 2008

So far, I have accepted three stories for the upcoming debut of the new Southern Fried Weirdness. I have several longer stories to go through in my slush pile, but am mostly caught up. If anyone has sent me anything prior to the first of April and hasn’t heard back from me yet, please let me know.

I have received a lot of fiction submissions but still need some poetry and non-fiction. For poetry, I am looking for a strong Southern voice or tone created by the imagery. A speculative element would be nice, but is not necessary. I tend to prefer free-verse, but am open-minded when it comes to my taste in poetry. I just like what I like.

Non-fiction: Book/Movie/Music reviews of works which can be classified as 1) Southern 2) Fried and 3) Weird. I am also looking for short articles about weird urban legends and modern myths from the South, be it paranormal (UFO’s, Cattle Mutilations, Ghost Stories), to strange families, to weird facts from history, etc. If it’s Southern and Weird, send it my way…

I have only had a couple poets submit poetry, and so far I have yet to receive any non-fiction submissions.  

Please read my full submission guidelines prior to submitting your work.

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64 responses

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

I appreciate that all small publishers are under financial constraints, but one dollar per poem is not close to the going rate for small press genre poems. Typical pay rates range from $5-$20 per poem, with lower rates generally limited to haiku. This may be one reason you haven’t received very many submissions. Sometimes you can overcome substandard pay scales by using personal contacts to get submissions. Perhaps you just need to get the word out more or wait a little while.

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for the feedback. It gives me something to think about. I’ve been considering raising the pay rates for poetry understanding that this could pose a problem. But at the same time, while writing out my guidelines, I was aware of many genre/literary publications that do not pay at all for poetry. I haven’t read them all, but some of these manage to put out great poetry (while others are edging on the Vogan poetry side of the spectrum).

I’d like to publish more poetry and offer more poets exposure, but if I raise the pay scale I couldn’t publish as much because of my budget. But then again, maybe it is worth sacrificing quantity for quality? That is part of why I went quarterly instead of weekly in the first place, after all. I will have to think this one over.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

literary and genre markets are completely different. Literary magazines don’t pay for poetry, even the best of them. They are markets for professional poets, English professors, and other people for whom published poems are professional publications. These build resumes and money isn’t really necessary. Plus, if you succeed as a mainstream poet, you can publish a book through a small but prestigious publishing house and possibly make some money that way. By contrast, genre markets have always paid for everything. Except the smallest small press publications. We are not hoping to build our professional resumes by selling poems about vampires on Neptune. We want the ego boost and the money. On the other side of the coin, I totally see where you’re coming from. I pay what I can afford, which is half what I would like to pay. But money isn’t everything even in the genre. The number of readers and the prestige of the publication are both very important. You don’t have those things yet. You do have the third thing that you can use to draw submitters and readers. Your reputation and your network of friends. Obviously I’m not counseling you to overspend, go broke, and then cease publication. I’m just saying that the amount you’re paying isn’t going to bring in very many people by itself.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

I appreciate that all small publishers are under financial constraints, but one dollar per poem is not close to the going rate for small press genre poems. Typical pay rates range from $5-$20 per poem, with lower rates generally limited to haiku. This may be one reason you haven’t received very many submissions. Sometimes you can overcome substandard pay scales by using personal contacts to get submissions. Perhaps you just need to get the word out more or wait a little while.

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for the feedback. It gives me something to think about. I’ve been considering raising the pay rates for poetry understanding that this could pose a problem. But at the same time, while writing out my guidelines, I was aware of many genre/literary publications that do not pay at all for poetry. I haven’t read them all, but some of these manage to put out great poetry (while others are edging on the Vogan poetry side of the spectrum).

I’d like to publish more poetry and offer more poets exposure, but if I raise the pay scale I couldn’t publish as much because of my budget. But then again, maybe it is worth sacrificing quantity for quality? That is part of why I went quarterly instead of weekly in the first place, after all. I will have to think this one over.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

literary and genre markets are completely different. Literary magazines don’t pay for poetry, even the best of them. They are markets for professional poets, English professors, and other people for whom published poems are professional publications. These build resumes and money isn’t really necessary. Plus, if you succeed as a mainstream poet, you can publish a book through a small but prestigious publishing house and possibly make some money that way. By contrast, genre markets have always paid for everything. Except the smallest small press publications. We are not hoping to build our professional resumes by selling poems about vampires on Neptune. We want the ego boost and the money. On the other side of the coin, I totally see where you’re coming from. I pay what I can afford, which is half what I would like to pay. But money isn’t everything even in the genre. The number of readers and the prestige of the publication are both very important. You don’t have those things yet. You do have the third thing that you can use to draw submitters and readers. Your reputation and your network of friends. Obviously I’m not counseling you to overspend, go broke, and then cease publication. I’m just saying that the amount you’re paying isn’t going to bring in very many people by itself.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

I appreciate that all small publishers are under financial constraints, but one dollar per poem is not close to the going rate for small press genre poems. Typical pay rates range from $5-$20 per poem, with lower rates generally limited to haiku. This may be one reason you haven’t received very many submissions. Sometimes you can overcome substandard pay scales by using personal contacts to get submissions. Perhaps you just need to get the word out more or wait a little while.

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for the feedback. It gives me something to think about. I’ve been considering raising the pay rates for poetry understanding that this could pose a problem. But at the same time, while writing out my guidelines, I was aware of many genre/literary publications that do not pay at all for poetry. I haven’t read them all, but some of these manage to put out great poetry (while others are edging on the Vogan poetry side of the spectrum).

I’d like to publish more poetry and offer more poets exposure, but if I raise the pay scale I couldn’t publish as much because of my budget. But then again, maybe it is worth sacrificing quantity for quality? That is part of why I went quarterly instead of weekly in the first place, after all. I will have to think this one over.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

literary and genre markets are completely different. Literary magazines don’t pay for poetry, even the best of them. They are markets for professional poets, English professors, and other people for whom published poems are professional publications. These build resumes and money isn’t really necessary. Plus, if you succeed as a mainstream poet, you can publish a book through a small but prestigious publishing house and possibly make some money that way. By contrast, genre markets have always paid for everything. Except the smallest small press publications. We are not hoping to build our professional resumes by selling poems about vampires on Neptune. We want the ego boost and the money. On the other side of the coin, I totally see where you’re coming from. I pay what I can afford, which is half what I would like to pay. But money isn’t everything even in the genre. The number of readers and the prestige of the publication are both very important. You don’t have those things yet. You do have the third thing that you can use to draw submitters and readers. Your reputation and your network of friends. Obviously I’m not counseling you to overspend, go broke, and then cease publication. I’m just saying that the amount you’re paying isn’t going to bring in very many people by itself.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

I appreciate that all small publishers are under financial constraints, but one dollar per poem is not close to the going rate for small press genre poems. Typical pay rates range from $5-$20 per poem, with lower rates generally limited to haiku. This may be one reason you haven’t received very many submissions. Sometimes you can overcome substandard pay scales by using personal contacts to get submissions. Perhaps you just need to get the word out more or wait a little while.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

I appreciate that all small publishers are under financial constraints, but one dollar per poem is not close to the going rate for small press genre poems. Typical pay rates range from $5-$20 per poem, with lower rates generally limited to haiku. This may be one reason you haven’t received very many submissions. Sometimes you can overcome substandard pay scales by using personal contacts to get submissions. Perhaps you just need to get the word out more or wait a little while.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

I appreciate that all small publishers are under financial constraints, but one dollar per poem is not close to the going rate for small press genre poems. Typical pay rates range from $5-$20 per poem, with lower rates generally limited to haiku. This may be one reason you haven’t received very many submissions. Sometimes you can overcome substandard pay scales by using personal contacts to get submissions. Perhaps you just need to get the word out more or wait a little while.

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for the feedback. It gives me something to think about. I’ve been considering raising the pay rates for poetry understanding that this could pose a problem. But at the same time, while writing out my guidelines, I was aware of many genre/literary publications that do not pay at all for poetry. I haven’t read them all, but some of these manage to put out great poetry (while others are edging on the Vogan poetry side of the spectrum).

I’d like to publish more poetry and offer more poets exposure, but if I raise the pay scale I couldn’t publish as much because of my budget. But then again, maybe it is worth sacrificing quantity for quality? That is part of why I went quarterly instead of weekly in the first place, after all. I will have to think this one over.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

literary and genre markets are completely different. Literary magazines don’t pay for poetry, even the best of them. They are markets for professional poets, English professors, and other people for whom published poems are professional publications. These build resumes and money isn’t really necessary. Plus, if you succeed as a mainstream poet, you can publish a book through a small but prestigious publishing house and possibly make some money that way. By contrast, genre markets have always paid for everything. Except the smallest small press publications. We are not hoping to build our professional resumes by selling poems about vampires on Neptune. We want the ego boost and the money. On the other side of the coin, I totally see where you’re coming from. I pay what I can afford, which is half what I would like to pay. But money isn’t everything even in the genre. The number of readers and the prestige of the publication are both very important. You don’t have those things yet. You do have the third thing that you can use to draw submitters and readers. Your reputation and your network of friends. Obviously I’m not counseling you to overspend, go broke, and then cease publication. I’m just saying that the amount you’re paying isn’t going to bring in very many people by itself.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

I appreciate that all small publishers are under financial constraints, but one dollar per poem is not close to the going rate for small press genre poems. Typical pay rates range from $5-$20 per poem, with lower rates generally limited to haiku. This may be one reason you haven’t received very many submissions. Sometimes you can overcome substandard pay scales by using personal contacts to get submissions. Perhaps you just need to get the word out more or wait a little while.

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for the feedback. It gives me something to think about. I’ve been considering raising the pay rates for poetry understanding that this could pose a problem. But at the same time, while writing out my guidelines, I was aware of many genre/literary publications that do not pay at all for poetry. I haven’t read them all, but some of these manage to put out great poetry (while others are edging on the Vogan poetry side of the spectrum).

I’d like to publish more poetry and offer more poets exposure, but if I raise the pay scale I couldn’t publish as much because of my budget. But then again, maybe it is worth sacrificing quantity for quality? That is part of why I went quarterly instead of weekly in the first place, after all. I will have to think this one over.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

literary and genre markets are completely different. Literary magazines don’t pay for poetry, even the best of them. They are markets for professional poets, English professors, and other people for whom published poems are professional publications. These build resumes and money isn’t really necessary. Plus, if you succeed as a mainstream poet, you can publish a book through a small but prestigious publishing house and possibly make some money that way. By contrast, genre markets have always paid for everything. Except the smallest small press publications. We are not hoping to build our professional resumes by selling poems about vampires on Neptune. We want the ego boost and the money. On the other side of the coin, I totally see where you’re coming from. I pay what I can afford, which is half what I would like to pay. But money isn’t everything even in the genre. The number of readers and the prestige of the publication are both very important. You don’t have those things yet. You do have the third thing that you can use to draw submitters and readers. Your reputation and your network of friends. Obviously I’m not counseling you to overspend, go broke, and then cease publication. I’m just saying that the amount you’re paying isn’t going to bring in very many people by itself.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

I appreciate that all small publishers are under financial constraints, but one dollar per poem is not close to the going rate for small press genre poems. Typical pay rates range from $5-$20 per poem, with lower rates generally limited to haiku. This may be one reason you haven’t received very many submissions. Sometimes you can overcome substandard pay scales by using personal contacts to get submissions. Perhaps you just need to get the word out more or wait a little while.

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for the feedback. It gives me something to think about. I’ve been considering raising the pay rates for poetry understanding that this could pose a problem. But at the same time, while writing out my guidelines, I was aware of many genre/literary publications that do not pay at all for poetry. I haven’t read them all, but some of these manage to put out great poetry (while others are edging on the Vogan poetry side of the spectrum).
I’d like to publish more poetry and offer more poets exposure, but if I raise the pay scale I couldn’t publish as much because of my budget. But then again, maybe it is worth sacrificing quantity for quality? That is part of why I went quarterly instead of weekly in the first place, after all. I will have to think this one over.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

literary and genre markets are completely different. Literary magazines don’t pay for poetry, even the best of them. They are markets for professional poets, English professors, and other people for whom published poems are professional publications. These build resumes and money isn’t really necessary. Plus, if you succeed as a mainstream poet, you can publish a book through a small but prestigious publishing house and possibly make some money that way. By contrast, genre markets have always paid for everything. Except the smallest small press publications. We are not hoping to build our professional resumes by selling poems about vampires on Neptune. We want the ego boost and the money. On the other side of the coin, I totally see where you’re coming from. I pay what I can afford, which is half what I would like to pay. But money isn’t everything even in the genre. The number of readers and the prestige of the publication are both very important. You don’t have those things yet. You do have the third thing that you can use to draw submitters and readers. Your reputation and your network of friends. Obviously I’m not counseling you to overspend, go broke, and then cease publication. I’m just saying that the amount you’re paying isn’t going to bring in very many people by itself.

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for the feedback. It gives me something to think about. I’ve been considering raising the pay rates for poetry understanding that this could pose a problem. But at the same time, while writing out my guidelines, I was aware of many genre/literary publications that do not pay at all for poetry. I haven’t read them all, but some of these manage to put out great poetry (while others are edging on the Vogan poetry side of the spectrum).

I’d like to publish more poetry and offer more poets exposure, but if I raise the pay scale I couldn’t publish as much because of my budget. But then again, maybe it is worth sacrificing quantity for quality? That is part of why I went quarterly instead of weekly in the first place, after all. I will have to think this one over.

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks for the feedback. It gives me something to think about. I’ve been considering raising the pay rates for poetry understanding that this could pose a problem. But at the same time, while writing out my guidelines, I was aware of many genre/literary publications that do not pay at all for poetry. I haven’t read them all, but some of these manage to put out great poetry (while others are edging on the Vogan poetry side of the spectrum).

I’d like to publish more poetry and offer more poets exposure, but if I raise the pay scale I couldn’t publish as much because of my budget. But then again, maybe it is worth sacrificing quantity for quality? That is part of why I went quarterly instead of weekly in the first place, after all. I will have to think this one over.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

literary and genre markets are completely different. Literary magazines don’t pay for poetry, even the best of them. They are markets for professional poets, English professors, and other people for whom published poems are professional publications. These build resumes and money isn’t really necessary. Plus, if you succeed as a mainstream poet, you can publish a book through a small but prestigious publishing house and possibly make some money that way. By contrast, genre markets have always paid for everything. Except the smallest small press publications. We are not hoping to build our professional resumes by selling poems about vampires on Neptune. We want the ego boost and the money. On the other side of the coin, I totally see where you’re coming from. I pay what I can afford, which is half what I would like to pay. But money isn’t everything even in the genre. The number of readers and the prestige of the publication are both very important. You don’t have those things yet. You do have the third thing that you can use to draw submitters and readers. Your reputation and your network of friends. Obviously I’m not counseling you to overspend, go broke, and then cease publication. I’m just saying that the amount you’re paying isn’t going to bring in very many people by itself.

4 05 2008
dreamnnightmare

literary and genre markets are completely different. Literary magazines don’t pay for poetry, even the best of them. They are markets for professional poets, English professors, and other people for whom published poems are professional publications. These build resumes and money isn’t really necessary. Plus, if you succeed as a mainstream poet, you can publish a book through a small but prestigious publishing house and possibly make some money that way. By contrast, genre markets have always paid for everything. Except the smallest small press publications. We are not hoping to build our professional resumes by selling poems about vampires on Neptune. We want the ego boost and the money. On the other side of the coin, I totally see where you’re coming from. I pay what I can afford, which is half what I would like to pay. But money isn’t everything even in the genre. The number of readers and the prestige of the publication are both very important. You don’t have those things yet. You do have the third thing that you can use to draw submitters and readers. Your reputation and your network of friends. Obviously I’m not counseling you to overspend, go broke, and then cease publication. I’m just saying that the amount you’re paying isn’t going to bring in very many people by itself.

4 05 2008
will_couvillier

I’m sure you’ll receive more poetry submissions. After all, any you accept wil be a publication cred, on top of the small pay — a long biblio is cool.

Heck, I’ll have to look through and to see if I have any that are smooth and southern, surreal, or just weird. I’ve jotted down some over the years when nothing came to me for story writing…

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks. I’d love to see them.

4 05 2008
will_couvillier

I’m sure you’ll receive more poetry submissions. After all, any you accept wil be a publication cred, on top of the small pay — a long biblio is cool.

Heck, I’ll have to look through and to see if I have any that are smooth and southern, surreal, or just weird. I’ve jotted down some over the years when nothing came to me for story writing…

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks. I’d love to see them.

4 05 2008
will_couvillier

I’m sure you’ll receive more poetry submissions. After all, any you accept wil be a publication cred, on top of the small pay — a long biblio is cool.

Heck, I’ll have to look through and to see if I have any that are smooth and southern, surreal, or just weird. I’ve jotted down some over the years when nothing came to me for story writing…

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks. I’d love to see them.

4 05 2008
will_couvillier

I’m sure you’ll receive more poetry submissions. After all, any you accept wil be a publication cred, on top of the small pay — a long biblio is cool.

Heck, I’ll have to look through and to see if I have any that are smooth and southern, surreal, or just weird. I’ve jotted down some over the years when nothing came to me for story writing…

4 05 2008
will_couvillier

I’m sure you’ll receive more poetry submissions. After all, any you accept wil be a publication cred, on top of the small pay — a long biblio is cool.

Heck, I’ll have to look through and to see if I have any that are smooth and southern, surreal, or just weird. I’ve jotted down some over the years when nothing came to me for story writing…

4 05 2008
will_couvillier

I’m sure you’ll receive more poetry submissions. After all, any you accept wil be a publication cred, on top of the small pay — a long biblio is cool.

Heck, I’ll have to look through and to see if I have any that are smooth and southern, surreal, or just weird. I’ve jotted down some over the years when nothing came to me for story writing…

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks. I’d love to see them.

4 05 2008
will_couvillier

I’m sure you’ll receive more poetry submissions. After all, any you accept wil be a publication cred, on top of the small pay — a long biblio is cool.

Heck, I’ll have to look through and to see if I have any that are smooth and southern, surreal, or just weird. I’ve jotted down some over the years when nothing came to me for story writing…

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks. I’d love to see them.

4 05 2008
will_couvillier

I’m sure you’ll receive more poetry submissions. After all, any you accept wil be a publication cred, on top of the small pay — a long biblio is cool.
Heck, I’ll have to look through and to see if I have any that are smooth and southern, surreal, or just weird. I’ve jotted down some over the years when nothing came to me for story writing…

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks. I’d love to see them.

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks. I’d love to see them.

4 05 2008
southernweirdo

Thanks. I’d love to see them.

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Question: Poetry and Non- are to be submitted in the same format as stories? Multiple subs on Poetry, or one at a time?

5 05 2008
southernweirdo

I like single submissions. I don’t intend to include more than one poem per author (unless it is clearly a cycle that works together as a whole). As far as formatting the submissions, I do like them in the body of the email. If needed I may ask for an attachment later.

Thanks for pointing that out. I’ll need to update my submission guidelines to clarify.

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Cool..I already sent you a poem under the “same as” format. Too many places have different requirements for story vs poem; I really hate to assume anything, and perhaps upset an editor (and my chances!) see….

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Question: Poetry and Non- are to be submitted in the same format as stories? Multiple subs on Poetry, or one at a time?

5 05 2008
southernweirdo

I like single submissions. I don’t intend to include more than one poem per author (unless it is clearly a cycle that works together as a whole). As far as formatting the submissions, I do like them in the body of the email. If needed I may ask for an attachment later.

Thanks for pointing that out. I’ll need to update my submission guidelines to clarify.

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Cool..I already sent you a poem under the “same as” format. Too many places have different requirements for story vs poem; I really hate to assume anything, and perhaps upset an editor (and my chances!) see….

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Question: Poetry and Non- are to be submitted in the same format as stories? Multiple subs on Poetry, or one at a time?

5 05 2008
southernweirdo

I like single submissions. I don’t intend to include more than one poem per author (unless it is clearly a cycle that works together as a whole). As far as formatting the submissions, I do like them in the body of the email. If needed I may ask for an attachment later.

Thanks for pointing that out. I’ll need to update my submission guidelines to clarify.

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Cool..I already sent you a poem under the “same as” format. Too many places have different requirements for story vs poem; I really hate to assume anything, and perhaps upset an editor (and my chances!) see….

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Question: Poetry and Non- are to be submitted in the same format as stories? Multiple subs on Poetry, or one at a time?

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Question: Poetry and Non- are to be submitted in the same format as stories? Multiple subs on Poetry, or one at a time?

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Question: Poetry and Non- are to be submitted in the same format as stories? Multiple subs on Poetry, or one at a time?

5 05 2008
southernweirdo

I like single submissions. I don’t intend to include more than one poem per author (unless it is clearly a cycle that works together as a whole). As far as formatting the submissions, I do like them in the body of the email. If needed I may ask for an attachment later.

Thanks for pointing that out. I’ll need to update my submission guidelines to clarify.

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Cool..I already sent you a poem under the “same as” format. Too many places have different requirements for story vs poem; I really hate to assume anything, and perhaps upset an editor (and my chances!) see….

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Question: Poetry and Non- are to be submitted in the same format as stories? Multiple subs on Poetry, or one at a time?

5 05 2008
southernweirdo

I like single submissions. I don’t intend to include more than one poem per author (unless it is clearly a cycle that works together as a whole). As far as formatting the submissions, I do like them in the body of the email. If needed I may ask for an attachment later.

Thanks for pointing that out. I’ll need to update my submission guidelines to clarify.

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Cool..I already sent you a poem under the “same as” format. Too many places have different requirements for story vs poem; I really hate to assume anything, and perhaps upset an editor (and my chances!) see….

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Question: Poetry and Non- are to be submitted in the same format as stories? Multiple subs on Poetry, or one at a time?

5 05 2008
southernweirdo

I like single submissions. I don’t intend to include more than one poem per author (unless it is clearly a cycle that works together as a whole). As far as formatting the submissions, I do like them in the body of the email. If needed I may ask for an attachment later.
Thanks for pointing that out. I’ll need to update my submission guidelines to clarify.

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Cool..I already sent you a poem under the “same as” format. Too many places have different requirements for story vs poem; I really hate to assume anything, and perhaps upset an editor (and my chances!) see….

5 05 2008
southernweirdo

I like single submissions. I don’t intend to include more than one poem per author (unless it is clearly a cycle that works together as a whole). As far as formatting the submissions, I do like them in the body of the email. If needed I may ask for an attachment later.

Thanks for pointing that out. I’ll need to update my submission guidelines to clarify.

5 05 2008
southernweirdo

I like single submissions. I don’t intend to include more than one poem per author (unless it is clearly a cycle that works together as a whole). As far as formatting the submissions, I do like them in the body of the email. If needed I may ask for an attachment later.

Thanks for pointing that out. I’ll need to update my submission guidelines to clarify.

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Cool..I already sent you a poem under the “same as” format. Too many places have different requirements for story vs poem; I really hate to assume anything, and perhaps upset an editor (and my chances!) see….

5 05 2008
will_couvillier

Cool..I already sent you a poem under the “same as” format. Too many places have different requirements for story vs poem; I really hate to assume anything, and perhaps upset an editor (and my chances!) see….

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